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7 results for The State Vol. 49 Issue 11, Apr 1982
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Record #:
8770
Author(s):
Abstract:
Gerald Johnson, distinguished journalist and author who died last year, listed Riverton in Scotland County as his birthplace. His great-great-grandmother, Catharine Campbell White, was the heroine of his novel BY REASON OF STRENGTH, and it was her dowry that bought most of the land now known as Riverton. Catharine was introduced to her future husband, Daniel White, through a Baptist evangelist. It was his calling to America that brought her from Scotland to North Carolina. Catharine lived for forty-two years after her husband's death, and helped establish the Richmond Temperance and Literary Society. She died on January 29, 1867 at the age of eighty.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 11, Apr 1982, p12-15, il, por
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Record #:
8769
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Abstract:
The Shelton House in Waynesville is home to the Museum of North Carolina Handicrafts. The museum group purchased the house from Charles E. Ray, Jr., in 1978. Cherokee Indian crafts and artifacts are on display, as are handicrafts from well-known artisans of the state. State grants funded restoration of the house, and the museum is open from May 1st to November 15th each year.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 11, Apr 1982, p7-8, il, por
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Record #:
8772
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Abstract:
Eustace Conway, age twenty, is known as the Mountain Man of the Piedmont. Living in a teepee in Lincoln County, Conway reads Walden and is completely self-reliant. He eats mostly fruit and peanut butter and believes in living in harmony with nature and not in competition with it. For this reason, he rarely kills animals or even plants. A true outdoorsman, in 1981, Conway hiked the Appalachian Trail, a 2,200-mile trip, in sixteen weeks. He canoed from St. Louis to New Orleans, a 1,030-mile trip, in a month.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 11, Apr 1982, p16-17, il, por
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Record #:
8771
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Abstract:
Slippery Hill Cemetery in Avery County has been the site of a number of strange occurrences since the turn of the century. Local citizens who have reported seeing a hovering light over the cemetery have died shortly after or lost someone close to them. Two men have crashed and died while driving past the cemetery. In the early 1900s, men on horses reported feeling a presence jump on the back of their horses as they rode past the cemetery. To this day, people avoiding looking at the cemetery for fear of seeing the lights.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 11, Apr 1982, p15, 31, il
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Record #:
8773
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Snowbird Mountain Lodge, ten miles outside of Robbinsville, has been open for forty years. Naturalists, birdwatchers, honeymooners, and hikers all frequent the lodge which offers the comforts of home in beautiful surroundings. Bob and Connie Rhudy own the forty-five-guest lodge and provide jigsaw puzzles, Monopoly, and cards to guests in the lobby.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 11, Apr 1982, p18, 31, il
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Record #:
8774
Author(s):
Abstract:
Just outside Highlands, in Horse Cove, stands a 145-foot yellow poplar tree that dwarfs all other surrounding trees, including several red oak trees. Scientifically known as LIRIODENDRON TULIPIFERA, the Horse Cove Poplar is commonly called the tulip poplar. The Wasilik Poplar, another yellow poplar located in North Carolina, was the national champion in the American Forestry Association's registry of big poplar trees until a larger tree was discovered in Bedford County, Virginia.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 11, Apr 1982, p19-20, il
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Record #:
8775
Author(s):
Abstract:
Started in 1972, Aqua-10 Corporation near Beaufort harvests seaweed and makes it into a concentrate used in crop spraying. Used primarily as a fertilizer supplement, this concentrate improves plant growth and development, may protect against frost damage, and is proven beneficial when used over several years.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 11, Apr 1982, p22
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