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6 results for The State Vol. 47 Issue 7, Dec 1979
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Record #:
9285
Abstract:
In 1862, Jacksonville was captured briefly by a Yankee raid led by Lieutenant William B. Cushing. The Confederate army, however, forced the Lieutenant's vessel, the U.S.S. ELLIS, aground where it remained until January. The Lieutenant and his men withdrew, freeing Jacksonville. \r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 7, Dec 1979, p22-23, il, por
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Record #:
9282
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Abstract:
Ex-Duke University football player, Frank Creech of Smithfield, now spends his time as an artist. Creech is a sculptor, painter, pot thrower, and printmaker. Some of his best work are sculpted brass timepieces, and can be seen at The Spring Branch Art Works where he works, as well as in various shows throughout the South.\r\n
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 7, Dec 1979, p16-18, il, por
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Record #:
9281
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Abstract:
In the foothills of Cascade Mountain in western Washington, many residents have North Carolina ties. They enjoy barbecue, blue grass music, and square dancing. Logging is what brought most people to Washington around the turn of the century, and their descendants enjoy a unique cultural identity.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 7, Dec 1979, p13, il
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Record #:
9280
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Abstract:
The author remembers living in the mountains as a young girl. Often, when a summer's crop failed to yield enough money for the family, they would search for Galax and Witch Hazel in the woods during the winter. The sale of these two herbs has been a mainstay for mountain families when income has been needed.\r\n
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 7, Dec 1979, p10-11, 38, il, por
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Record #:
9283
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Abstract:
Mistletoe grows abundantly in North Carolina, and many folk stories are associated with it. Norse mythology is where kissing under the mistletoe originated. Because it grows high in trees with no roots, ancient civilizations believed it to possess supernatural powers.\r\n
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 7, Dec 1979, p19, 25, il
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Record #:
9284
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fred T. Morgan, author of GHOST TALES OF TE UWHARRIES, recaps the original version of one of the folktales found in his 1968 book. It was re-drafted before publication after an anonymous reader suggested a better ending.\r\n
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 7, Dec 1979, p20-21, il
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