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7 results for The State Vol. 42 Issue 8, Jan 1975
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Record #:
9380
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Abstract:
Tiny Broadwicke, of Henderson, became a worldwide attraction as a parachutist starting with her first jump at the North Carolina State Fair in Raleigh in 1908. Later she became the first woman to parachute from a plane and the first person to make a premeditated “Free Fall” parachute jump.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 8, Jan 1975, p8-12, il, por
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Record #:
9385
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Abstract:
Folklore includes numerous tooth-related superstitions that seem ludicrous today. Two different species of trees in North Carolina, Aralia sinosa and Zanthoxylum americanum are both commonly known as “toothache tree” for their supposed medicinal value. In rural areas men known as “tooth jumpers” once practiced tooth removal with a punch and mallet.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 8, Jan 1975, p19-20, il
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Record #:
9384
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Abstract:
John Grady of Duplin County, the first North Carolinian casualty in the Revolutionary War, died at the Battle of Moore's Creek. Grady's remains have been exhumed from his monument in Wilmington and shall be re-interred with full military honors at the 199th anniversary celebration at Moore's Creek.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 8, Jan 1975, p17-18, 55, il
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Record #:
9382
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Abstract:
Legend dictates Purgatory Mountain received its name from Civil War days. A cruel Confederate recruiter living amongst Quaker conscientious objectors forced 22 thirteen and fourteen year old boys into the military. The boys eventually escaped, plotted against, and killed the recruiter whose ghost is said to still roam the mountain.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 8, Jan 1975, p13-15, 55, il
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Record #:
9381
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Abstract:
Leonard J. Presnell grows Nepeta Cataria, an herb commonly known as catnip, on an experimental basis in Watauga County. Catnip yields approximately 3,000 to 3,500 pounds to the acre at an average of 43 cents per pound. The herb was originally used making tea for medicinal purposes.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 8, Jan 1975, p12, por
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Record #:
9383
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's newest zoological park located at Purgatory Mountain in Asheboro is receiving animals almost daily for its interim zoo. It should take about twenty years to fully develop construction.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 8, Jan 1975, p15, il
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Record #:
9379
Author(s):
Abstract:
Each of North Carolina's one hundred counties provides a brief overview of the previous year's milestones.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 8, Jan 1975, p6-7, 21-54, il
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