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7 results for The State Vol. 42 Issue 3, Aug 1974
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Record #:
12327
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the Depression, William Dudley Pelley, journalist and promoter of mystical and political extremist teachings, moved to Asheville. There he founded Gallhad Press, where he published various propaganda attacking Jews and President Roosevelt. He also organized the \"Silver Shirts,\"a group he deemed the \"protestant militia of America,\"that would \"save America from a Jewish-sponsored communist plot.\" His headquarters were in Asheville from 1932 until 1941. In 1942, after World War II began, Pelley was convicted of sedition and sentenced to fifteen years in prison.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 3, Aug 1974, p15-16, il
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Record #:
12324
Author(s):
Abstract:
The first flag of the Confederate States of America was designed by Major Orren Randolph Smith and constructed by Miss Catherine Rebecca Murphy with her aunt and Miss Nora Sykes assisting. The flag first flew on the Franklin County Court House Square in Louisburg. This marked the turning point of public opinion from apathy to pro-secessionist-Confederacy.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 3, Aug 1974, p7-10, 41, il, por
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Record #:
12325
Abstract:
The historic Lincoln County home, Vesuvius, built in 1792 by Revolutionary leader General Joseph A. Graham, was the birthplace of William A. Graham. Graham, was a lawyer, planter, and Governor of North Carolina, and he served as Secretary of the Navy under President Millard Fillmore where he gained notoriety for masterminding the Perry Expedition to Japan.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 3, Aug 1974, p12-14, il, por
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Record #:
12329
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Abstract:
The longest S-shaped bridge in the world is located on the Perquimans River near Hertford. Making two seemingly needless curves, the bridge creates a picturesque scene, said to have inspired the popular song \"Carolina Moon.\"
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 3, Aug 1974, p18, il
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Record #:
12331
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Abstract:
Dr. William L. Garlick, a retired chest surgeon from Maryland, resides in Buxton on Hatteras Island. He began coming to Hatteras in 1936. White discusses his most unusual hobby for a North Carolina location - growing orchids.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 3, Aug 1974, p31, il
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Record #:
12330
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Abstract:
The McFarlan Post Office keeps the tiny Anson County town, population 150, \"on the map.\" A post office was located there in 1883, and nothing about the place has changed much since. The building remains a gathering place for citizens and a workplace for unrelenting and accommodating postmasters, Frances Moore and Louise Phillips.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 3, Aug 1974, p19-20, il
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Record #:
12326
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the Depression, William Dudley Pelley, journalist and promoter of mystical and political extremist teachings, moved to Asheville. There he founded Galahad Press, where he published various propaganda attacking Jews and President Roosevelt. He also organized the "Silver Shirts," a group he deemed the "protestant militia of America," that would "save America from a Jewish-sponsored communist plot." His headquarters were in Asheville from 1932 until 1941. In 1942, after World War II began, Pelley was convicted of sedition and sentenced to fifteen years in prison.'
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 3, Aug 1974, p15-16
Subject(s):
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