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7 results for The State Vol. 29 Issue 9, Sept 1961
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Record #:
12690
Abstract:
Several noted Anson County gentlemen are discussed for their great deeds toward their community and abroad. Listed among them are Dr. Hugh Hammon Bennet, considered the \"father of soil conservation.\" Also mentioned, among many others, is Colonel Leonidas LaFayette Polk, the first commissioner of the North Carolina Department of Agriculture and leader of the National Farmers Alliance.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 9, Sept 1961, p13-14, 27, por
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Record #:
12691
Abstract:
Carl Goerch terminated his 28 year span of broadcasting with his \"Carolina Chats\" program on radio station WPTF. Goerch, founder of The State in 1933, is something of a legend in Eastern North Carolina, his voice easily recognized by radio listeners. Goerch was known for his many practical jokes, including the report of a UFO during an airplane flight from Wilmington to Raleigh.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 9, Sept 1961, p36-37
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Record #:
12692
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Abstract:
The Moravians carried their distinctive traditions into the 19th century, founding a mission for the Cherokee Indians, as well as a Female Mission Society to work closely among slaves. Although their traditions continued, changes occurred including the possession of slaves, and the annex of Wachovia lands into the county seat of Forsyth. This last change touched off an uproar in Salem, bringing the brethren into close contact with progressive influences.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 9, Sept 1961, p31-32, por
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Record #:
12689
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Abstract:
Partly located in the Piedmont, and partly coastal plains, Anson County was known previously for its plantations. In an effort to balance its agricultural economy, Anson is now tinged with the trappings of modern industry. Anson County's 211-year history includes dissent, border disputes, and battles.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 9, Sept 1961, p8-10, 21, il, map
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Record #:
12693
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Abstract:
Boiling Springs in Brunswick County is noted as the largest real estate development in North Carolina, already selling over 2,000 building lots. The Brunswick County landscape is dominated by the presence of 50 lakes and ponds, the longest 2.5 miles long. Homes designed especially for senior citizens are anticipated, likely making Boiling Springs popular among retirees.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 9, Sept 1961, p43-45, il
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Record #:
12694
Abstract:
Originally planned as a great inland port, only a scrawny chimney and a cemetery mark the location of the once flourishing Sneedsborough, North Carolina. Attracting many leaders of the day, Sneedsborough thrived for approximately 30 years, until the lack of commerce and the spread of epidemics forced most of the residents to move elsewhere.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 9, Sept 1961, p11, il
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Record #:
13441
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Abstract:
The boundary dispute in the 1740s between North and South Carolina found Anson County caught in the middle. Continued confusion over land rights resulted in forced land seizures, and land holders refusing to pay taxes to North or South Carolina. The dispute and confusion continued until after the Revolutionary War.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 9, Sept 1961, p16-17, 29
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