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7 results for The State Vol. 20 Issue 26, Nov 1952
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Record #:
13689
Author(s):
Abstract:
Encompassing 9 towns and 944 square miles, Robeson County is expanding in population as well as in agricultural production. The first eastern county to abolish alcohol, Robeson was the first rural county in America to have a health department.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 26, Nov 1952, p3-5, 33-34, il
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Record #:
13697
Abstract:
Formed in 1787 from Bladen County, Robeson County was named for Colonel Thomas Robeson. Encompassing 604,160 acres, approximately half of which is forests, Robeson has the largest acreage under cultivation in North Carolina. Statistics related to population, rainfall, temperature, agricultural production, and wages, are given.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 26, Nov 1952, p36
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Record #:
13691
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lumberton is celebrating its centennial in 1952 because, although founded in 1787, the town was not incorporated until 1852. Sustained through the tobacco industry, Lumberton has continued to expand in population as well as facilities. This article offers information regarding tax rates, the tobacco industry, and the origins of town's name.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 26, Nov 1952, p7, 25-26, il, por
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Record #:
13696
Author(s):
Abstract:
St. Pauls, Red Springs, Rowland, Pembroke, Maxton, Parkton, and Lumberbridge - all towns in Robeson County - have changed dramatically since the 18th century. Brief histories, facts, and statistics about these towns are presented.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 26, Nov 1952, p28-31, il
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Record #:
13695
Author(s):
Abstract:
\"As you love your state, hold Robeson [County]!\" This is the most famous political battle cry of North Carolina and originated over conflicts stemming from electing delegates to the 1868 Constitutional Convention.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 26, Nov 1952, p22-24, map
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Record #:
13690
Author(s):
Abstract:
From 1864 to 1872, Henry Berry Lowry and his gang terrorized citizens of Robeson County. Lowry supposedly killed himself in 1872 while loading his gun, however, his body was never found.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 26, Nov 1952, p6
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Record #:
13694
Author(s):
Abstract:
Three races of Native Americans populate Robeson County; they are the Doegs, Melange, and Malungeons. The author suggests that this can be attributed to inter-racial procreation between Native Americans and the lost colonists from Roanoke.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 26, Nov 1952, p9-11, il
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