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4 results for The Researcher Vol. 21 Issue 1, Spring-Summer 2005
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Record #:
34707
Abstract:
The Lords Proprietors selected Beaufort, NC as the seat of local government for newly established Carteret County in 1722. Beaufort, settled in 1709, was coincidentally chosen as an official customs port and colonial port of entry. These roles mandated creation of a court to oversee lawsuits and pleas, and to rule on criminal proceedings. The magistrates and clerk would gather four times each year to hear new cases. Small residences and buildings served as the courthouse until an official structure was erected in 1796. Measuring only 25 feet by 30 feet, the courthouse functioned until 1843 when it became a private residence. In 1976, the Beaufort Historical Association bought the courthouse and eventually began its restoration. Today, the courthouse is part of the Beaufort Historic Site and is interpreted for its 19th century role.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 21 Issue 1, Spring-Summer 2005, p3-6, il
Record #:
34710
Author(s):
Abstract:
The morning of December 30, 1941, the convoy vessel ALEXANDER HAMILTON pulled away from Norfolk Harbor to escort ships from Newfoundland to Europe. As early as 1939, German U-boats were actively patrolling the North Atlantic, targeting merchant ships. By 1942, an estimated 360 vessels had been attacked, leading to the formation of a convoy system. ALEXANDER HAMILTON, crewed by several Carteret County residents, arrived in Newfoundland on January 12, 1942. Joining a convoy of 35 cargo vessels and 6 destroyers, the vessel proceeded into the North Atlantic and soon received reports of nearby submarine activity. On January 29, 1942, torpedoes from the U-132 struck HAMILTON on the starboard side, killing twenty crew members including Livingston Brooks, the first Carteret County native killed in World War II.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 21 Issue 1, Spring-Summer 2005, p21-25, il, por
Record #:
34709
Author(s):
Abstract:
In early November 1861, French Man-of-War PRONY was stranded near Ocracoke Inlet. Catching sight of the vessel, the master of USS UNDERWRITER sent message they would provide aid. Unable to reach the vessel, however, UNDERWRITER retreated leaving PRONY vulnerable to attack. Confederate forces arrived on the scene and instead of attacking, offered assistance. While PRONY was not rescued, the crew were taken onboard CSS CURLEW and brought to New Bern.
Source:
Record #:
34708
Author(s):
Abstract:
Reverend Daniel Reid was the Methodist pastor in Stella, North Carolina. Reid kept a diary between 1895 and 1896 which documents his daily activities and family life. While responsible for the parish, Reid also worked part time at a local lumber mill and was a prominent community member.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 21 Issue 1, Spring-Summer 2005, p7-19, il, por