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7 results for The Researcher Vol. 20 Issue 1, Spring 2004
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Record #:
34698
Abstract:
This article discusses the intersection of two Carteret County residents—Confederate General Robert E. Lee and Elizabeth Oakes Prince Smith, the mother of the infamous Appleton Oaksmith. Lee was responsible for the inspection of forts in North Carolina, and in 1840, arrived at Beaufort. While Lee would spend the next year fortifying Fort Macon, he left for New York City in 1841. At the same time, Elizabeth Oaksmith and family resided in New York City where she met General Lee. The two met and conversed on bravery and their long-term dreams. Eventually, Oaksmith would move to Carteret County where she later wrote on her memories of the General.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 20 Issue 1, Spring 2004, p3-5
Record #:
34700
Author(s):
Abstract:
In January 1942, the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter ALEXANDER HAMILTON was transporting a Navy provision ship into Reykjavik Harbor when she was struck by German submarine U-132. Struck on its starboard side, HAMILTON began to settle but did not sink. The engine room and fire room were both wrecked, and the ship immediately lost power. Livingston Brooks, a Harkers Island resident, was killed instantly in the explosion along with nineteen other crew members. Five other Carteret County residents were on board and survived the attack. Remaining crew were all rescued while HAMILTON capsized. Those lost in the attack are memorialized in Cambridge, England.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 20 Issue 1, Spring 2004, p7-9, il, por
Record #:
34701
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the Second World War, the U.S. Coast Guard was responsible for enforcing and controlling the movement of vessels in various ports and in-land waters. In 1942, Lieutenant N.H. Church was assigned as Captain of the Port of Morehead City. All vessels moving in local waters were required to carry a license or identification card issued by the Captain of the Port; Church sent various reports to the U.S. Coast Guard in 1943 and 1944 documenting local vessel traffic. These reports address topics including submarine patrols, local waters under surveillance, vessels ashore, and escaped naval mines.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 20 Issue 1, Spring 2004, p10-15
Record #:
34703
Author(s):
Abstract:
Diamond City, North Carolina, was once home to fifty families who were actively engaged with homesteading and fishing. Additional income was found when ships and their cargoes washed ashore; many materials were incorporated into house construction. While access to resources made life difficult, it was the 1899 hurricane which brought an end to the small community. The storm hit the coast and many families decided to return to the mainland. Some even brought their homes with them across the sound.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 20 Issue 1, Spring 2004, p18-19, il
Record #:
34699
Author(s):
Abstract:
Beaufort, North Carolina, was hit by a hurricane in September 1903. The fishing steamer BEATRICE was seining for menhaden offshore when the storm struck. Several other vessels which survived the gale began patrolling the seas looking for survivors and BEATRICE, but they had no luck. Ten days after the storm, the bow of BEATRICE washed ashore at Caffey’s Inlet, approximately 100 miles from the vessel’s last known location. The crew was never found.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 20 Issue 1, Spring 2004, p6-7
Record #:
34704
Abstract:
Macajah Adams, a Salter Path native, worked as a carpenter and shipbuilder during the first half of the 19th century. Adams’ workspace was his yard; utilizing local juniper and cypress woods, he constructed vessels without the aid of blueprints. Once finished, boats were launched into Bogue Sound and outfit with motors and electrical systems.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 20 Issue 1, Spring 2004, p19-21, il, por
Record #:
34702
Author(s):
Abstract:
During prohibition in the 1920s, the American schooner VINCENT ran aground on Cape Lookout. Residents from Cape Lookout caught sight of the vessel and went out to see the wreck firsthand. They discovered vinegar bottles filled with scotch whiskey on shore and began collecting the cargo. The fisherman proceeded to recover and sell the whiskey casks.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 20 Issue 1, Spring 2004, p15-17, il