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4 results for The Researcher Vol. 19 Issue 1, Spring 2003
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Record #:
34679
Author(s):
Abstract:
Established through a Works Progress Administration (WPA) Project, the Beaufort Community Center was constructed in 1936 for recreational use. While the center facilitated use of the associated tennis courts and golf course, it took on an administrative role when the WPA moved their administrative offices onto the property in 1939. During the Second World War, soldiers camped on the property while the center hosted dances to support the war effort. The U.S. Coast Guard purchased the property in 1943 and used the center as a barracks and communications facility through the end of the war. Following a fire at the local school in 1945, the community center again transformed to meet community need and served as a temporary school for the next two years. In 1950, the Beaufort community Center was destroyed by fire and the land was turned over to the town.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 19 Issue 1, Spring 2003, p3-5, il
Record #:
34687
Abstract:
Exploring Garbacon Creek and the Neuse River during his youth, Richard Carraway Jr. discovered various historic artifacts, including pottery, glass bottles, arrowheads, and clay pipes. On occasion, human remains would wash out of the riverbank prompting a visit from local archaeologists. Carraway would explore these sites and found arrowheads in association with human remains, leading to the assumption that the site was associated with warring Native American factions. As erosion increased, however, Carraway found evidence of wooden coffins suggesting the burials were remains of European colonists killed in the Tuscarora uprising of 1711. Since his childhood, Carraway has continued to study the site and the history of the associated Garbacon plantation.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 19 Issue 1, Spring 2003, p12-14, il
Record #:
34685
Abstract:
Asa B. Buck was a local Carteret County boatbuilder who worked from the 1920s through 1969. A North Carolina native, Buck began his career at the Bell Wallace shipyard in Morehead City. He also constructed and repaired small vessels for neighbors and personal use. Relying on homemade plans, Buck would sketch out each timber on the floor of his workshop and cut the associated lumber, usually Cedar, to form.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 19 Issue 1, Spring 2003, p7-10, il, por
Record #:
34686
Abstract:
A graduate of the University of North Carolina, Dr. Ben Royal worked as a physician and surgeon in Morehead City. During the Second World War, Dr. Royal anticipated increased use of hospital facilities and was responsible for the installation of a 32 bed emergency wing. This wing continued to function until 1967. Dr. Royal himself worked in Morehead City from 1911 to 1962.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 19 Issue 1, Spring 2003, p10, il, por