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6 results for The Researcher Vol. 16 Issue 1, Winter 2000
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Record #:
34623
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lt. William Barker Cushing was a Union naval officer who, in 1862, took the gunboat USS ELLIS up the New River to attack any blockade runners upstream and raid Jacksonville. Cushing had been given ELLIS in October 1862 while under orders to watch Bogue Inlet. The 200 ton ELLIS, captured from Confederate forces the spring before, was outfit with two 32-pound guns and a crew of 30 men. In late November, 1862, Cushing entered the New River and proceeded towards Jacksonville. Arriving at the town, Cushing and his men captured several slaves, arms, clothing, and two sailing schooners. On return to the river mouth, Confederate cavalry followed the flotilla and fired on the sailors. An ambush was prepared further down river but was prematurely initiated, giving Cushing time to engage those on shore. ELLIS’ guns proved more powerful and the Confederate forces retreated. Cushing set out towards the river mouth only to ground before reaching New River inlet. Confederate forces returned and soon destroyed ELLIS, however Cushing and his men were able to escape on one of the schooners.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 16 Issue 1, Winter 2000, p17-25, il, por, map
Record #:
34624
Author(s):
Abstract:
Despite the Union’s control of the Outer Banks early in the war, Wilmington remained a Confederate port through 1864. Engineers had built a series of forts, batteries, and fieldworks around the city which aided in continued Confederate occupation. These obstacles were built to protect both the rail lines into the city and Wilmington’s port facilities—the preferred harbor for blockade runners due to its dual access. Following a failed Union expedition to capture Fort Fisher in 1864, Union forces successfully stormed the fort in 1865 and took the port of Wilmington soon after. The port’s capture precipitated later victories at Fayetteville and Goldsboro and brought an end to Confederate rebellion in North Carolina.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 16 Issue 1, Winter 2000, p26-36, il, por
Record #:
34620
Author(s):
Abstract:
The most successful Union operations conducted during the Civil War were those launched along the Outer Banks and inland waters in 1861 and 1862. Their success was due, in large part, to the inexperience of Confederate naval forces. Despite the general disorganization and inexperience of the U.S. Navy, Union officials understood the significance of waterways as a means to entering Southern states and delaying troop resupply. Union strategist George McClellan planned a number of amphibious operations on major waterways which would disrupt rail and communications in the South. These goals resulted in a plan to take control of Hatteras Inlet.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 16 Issue 1, Winter 2000, p4-6, il, por
Record #:
34621
Author(s):
Abstract:
The coastal sounds of North Carolina made ideal anchorages for vessels looking to avoid Atlantic storms and were used by Confederate forces as a base for naval operations. Adjacent terrestrial defenses were constructed to protect these anchorages, but were poorly manned and supplied. In 1861, the Union led an expedition against Hatteras Inlet fortifications, followed by attacks on Roanoke Island, New Bern, and Fort Macon. The fall of these fortifications increased Union strength in Eastern North Carolina and provided Union forces with protected naval bases they would utilize through the end of the war.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 16 Issue 1, Winter 2000, p7-12, f
Record #:
34622
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fort Macon was constructed in 1826 as part of a costal chain of defense fortifications. Used intermittently following its construction, the ill-staffed fort was taken by a local secessionist militia in 1861 and became a base for Confederate volunteers. In the summer of 1861, the fort was staffed by eight infantry and heavy artillery companies. Following Union triumph at New Bern, Fort Macon was cut off from Confederate resources. Troops at the fort withdrew into the fortification and destroyed surrounding outbuildings in preparation of attack. On April 25, 1862, the Union began bombardment of the fort, eventually breaching the wall and damaging the magazine. Confederate forces surrendered the fort to the Union the following morning. Fort Macon would continue to be used as a fort and prison following the war. In 1923, the fort became a state park.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 16 Issue 1, Winter 2000, p13-16, il, por
Record #:
34625
Abstract:
This article is a reprint of an 1865 poem written by Narcissa Davis. Davis worked as a Confederate nurse in Goldsboro and an activist for the war cause. The poem addresses the tragedy and sacrifice of the American Civil War.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 16 Issue 1, Winter 2000, p37