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7 results for Tar Heel Vol. 5 Issue 5, Oct 1977
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Record #:
6020
Author(s):
Abstract:
Raleigh novelist Ben Haas discusses writing, writers, and growing up in Charlotte in this TAR HEEL magazine interview. The son of a German immigrant, Haas has had over 50 books published in his 30 years of writing. Most were written under pseudonyms.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 5, Oct 1977, p8-11, por
Record #:
35625
Author(s):
Abstract:
The town named from a Revolutionary War general was a study in contrasts. It was home to attractive houses and unattractive city sprawl, a NC town with deep English colonial roots and Asian, Greek, and Italian communities. It became home to 30,000 plus veterans returning post retirement, often the same soldiers who resented their time at Fort Bragg. It had experienced much recent business growth in the past two decades, evident in businesses such as the convention-motel entertainment complex. Nevertheless, an economic home base could be found in the old part of the city, particularly in places like the Market House.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 5, Oct 1977, p20-22, 37-41
Record #:
35627
Author(s):
Abstract:
Summer fishing had its attraction, but it was more for tourists, the author opined. To his estimation, fishing in the time after the vacationers left had at least three special qualities. The onset of chill encouraging the catch to move to deeper waters, was the first. The departure of the masses leaves more space in the waterways, was the second. The exodus of summertime insects makes the experience on the open water more pleasant, was the third.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 5, Oct 1977, p30-33
Record #:
35628
Author(s):
Abstract:
The public education experience for many in decades past was spent in one room schoolhouses. The people of Williamston were reminded of that experience. It came with the arrival of the Poplar Point School, constructed circa Civil War and lately restored to its original condition. With its migration from this small town came reminders of that way of life for students. It was one different in many ways and better in some ways, to the author’s estimation.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 5, Oct 1977, p34-36
Record #:
35626
Author(s):
Abstract:
A visit with Newman and Geneva Levi of Green River revealed much about the lifeways of small towns and their people. As evident by this couple, life was still often defined by wood burning stoves and canned vegetables. It was also marked by talks after the time of day still known as daydown, talk including tales of outsiders who didn’t find their visits so pleasant.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 5, Oct 1977, p26-28, 45
Record #:
35624
Author(s):
Abstract:
The last hermit: Carlton Seely, originally from Virginia, settled in seclusion for a majority of his eighty eight years. An irony of his hermit identity: the friendliness of a certain group of people encouraged him to settle. Otherwise, the identity was earned in the closer communion he had with nature than the nearby townsfolk for much of his life in Uwharrie National Forest.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 5, Oct 1977, p16-18
Record #:
35623
Author(s):
Abstract:
The journey took the author and her husband through major and minor waterways along the Coast toward their New Jersey destination. What the eventful October adventure proved: home can be aboard a small ship or ashore in the house she was glad to return to.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 5, Oct 1977, p12-15