NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


94 results for Recall
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 7
Next
Record #:
21643
Author(s):
Abstract:
On December 8, 2012, the people of Monroe, at the encouragement of the Sons of Confederate Veterans and the Society of the Order of the Confederate Rose, erected a monument in front of the Union County Courthouse honoring ten Confederate soldiers--all African American. Northrop highlights other black soldiers who served in the Confederate army as well as Northern professors, teachers, and bloggers who deny this really was true.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 19 Issue 1, Spr 2013, p1-4, il, por
Full Text:
Record #:
21644
Author(s):
Abstract:
The group known as the \"founding fathers\" of the United States came from all thirteen colonies. Winstead recounts the life of one of them--Cornelius Harnett, Jr.--who is all but unknown to North Carolinians today but who deserves to be counted among them. \"He was neither a signer of the Declaration of Independence or a framer of the Constitution, but instead was one of those who aided the cause to resist the efforts of the British Government.\"
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 19 Issue 1, Spr 2013, p14-17, il
Full Text:
Record #:
21645
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Southern campaign of the American Revolution came to a climax in Guilford County on March 15, 1781. Some 4,000 Americans, under the command of Nathanael Greene, waited as Lord Cornwallis approached from the west. Kieron recounts the events of the battle.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 19 Issue 1, Spr 2013, p18-22
Full Text:
Record #:
21576
Abstract:
Born in western Wake County in 1894, Goodwin later served as a Pharmacist's Mate 1c with the 6th Marines on the Western Front during World War I. With them he fought through some of the most famous battles in American military history--Verdun, Belleau Wood and Bouresches, Chateau Thierry, St. Mihiel, Mont Blac, and the spic Meuse Argonne Offensive. Among his awards and citations were the Navy Cross, Croix de Guerre (France), Silver Star, and the Second Division Citation awarded for actions on June 6, 1918 and for actions at Thiaucourt on September 15, 1918. Goodwin returned to Wake County and practiced medicine until a few days before his death.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 18 Issue 1, Spr 2012, p5-12, il, por
Full Text:
Record #:
21642
Author(s):
Abstract:
Northrop recounts activities of blockade runners operating out of Wilmington, names of ships, and some of the famous captains of blockade runners and raiders, like John Wilkinson and John Newland.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 18 Issue 1, Spr 2012, p13-17, il, por
Full Text:
Record #:
21562
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cooke recounts the wartime experiences of Henry Murphy of Burgaw, a carrier pilot aboard the USS Enterprise in the South Pacific during World War II. Murphy was flying an Avenger torpedo plane along with his two-man crew during a major two-day attack on Formosa on October 12, 1944, when his plane was shot down killing all three men.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 17 Issue 1, Spr 2011, p9-12, il, por, map, bibl
Full Text:
Record #:
21561
Author(s):
Abstract:
Winstead of Elm City recalls his experiences serving with the 30th Division, 119th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Battalion, Company M for four years, nine months, and nine days during World War II.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 17 Issue 1, Spr 2011, p13-21, il, por
Full Text:
Record #:
21524
Abstract:
Barrie S. Davis of Zebulon was flying his P-51 Mustang fighter as bomber escort on a mission to Romania on June 6, 1944 when he was attacked by a German Me-109. Davis's canopy was shot away and his right wing shredded. Wounded, he was able to make it back to his base in Russia. For years he wondered who his opponent had been. In 2009, the opportunity came, and he flew to Bucharest to meet the other pilot, Ion Dobran, now a retired Romanian air force general.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 16 Issue 1, Spr 2010, p1-3, il, por
Record #:
21545
Author(s):
Abstract:
McGlohon from Asheboro, a photographer flying in a B-29 attached to the 8th Air Force, along with ten other crewmen, did not receive the order to stay away from Hiroshima on August 6, 1945. They witnessed the Enola Gay going in the opposite direction from them and the sudden bright flash from below. Then they were over the city and McGlohon took his unique photo from directly above the rising mushroom cloud. However, for the next forty years no one believed his story because his plane wasn't supposed to be there. Finally, Ken Samuelson researched and found the proof of McGlohon's historic photo.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 16 Issue 2, Fall 2010, p7-9, il, por
Full Text:
Record #:
21546
Abstract:
McLawhorn recounts how Ted Sampley, publisher and editor of the Kinston Dispatch, uncovered information that the remains in the Vietnam War Tomb of the Unknown were not unknown but known and that the Pentagon had covered it up. The remains were those of Lt. Michael John Blassie who was shot down and killed on May 11, 1972. He was re-interred twenty-six years later in the Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery in St. Louis. Sampley did two Vietnam tours with the Special Forces, and his awards include the Combat Infantryman Badge and two Bronze Star medals with V for Valor.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 16 Issue 2, Fall 2010, p9-10
Full Text:
Record #:
21547
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article follows the experiences of John Wesley Bone of Nash County who served through the Civil War with the 30th Regiment, North Carolina Troops, Company I. Bone later wrote of his wartime life in A Personal Memoir of the Civil War Service of John Wesley Bone: A Confederate Soldier from Nash County which was published in 1904.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 16 Issue 2, Fall 2010, p11-19, bibl, f
Full Text:
Record #:
21554
Abstract:
A \"band of others,\" as opposed to a \"band of brothers,\" means, in this case, men who did not serve as a single group during World War II, Korea, or other wars, but who served individually in various service branches. The commonality among them is that they are all members of the First Presbyterian Church in Raleigh. In this article Campbell recounts the war experiences of William Jackson Hester (Korea) and Charles S. Cooper (World War II).
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 16 Issue 2, Fall 2010, p21-23
Full Text:
Record #:
21503
Author(s):
Abstract:
At age eighteen, Tom Dennis left his recent bride in Durham in 1943 and took a bus to join the US Army in World War II. He was assigned to the 34th Infantry Division which spent 517 days in combat in North Africa and Italy. Davis later said he felt he led a charmed life being in a number of life-threatening moments but escaping without a scratch. Harrell's article is a mixture of his additions together with Dennis's narrative. Among the awards Dennis received were the Silver and Bronze Stars, the Combat infantryman Badge, and the Distinguished Service Award.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 15 Issue 1, Spr 2009, p1-4, por
Full Text:
Record #:
21505
Author(s):
Abstract:
Carr was born in Duplin County and at age thirty-three joined Company C (1st) 12th Regiment North Carolina Troops for six months. When the company disbanded in November 1861, he joined the 43rd Regiment NCT as Lieutenant of Company A. He was wounded and captured at Gettysburg. He was moved to three different prison camps between then and June 1864. In August 1864, he was sent to Morris Island as part of the \"Immortal Six Hundred,\" prisoners who were placed in line of fire on the island from the guns at Fort Sumter. Carr died three months after the war ended. He was the longest held North Carolina prisoner of war during the Civil War--one year, eleven months, and twenty-nine days.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 15 Issue 1, Spr 2009, p15, por
Full Text:
Record #:
21504
Author(s):
Abstract:
Campbell had two great-grandfathers who fought in the Civil War and that his wife Peggy also had a great-grandfather, William Jesse Beach, who fought. Campbell recounts the story of Beach who was born in Martin County, joined the 1st Regiment North Carolina Infantry, and was killed at the Battle of Chancellorsville in 1863.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 15 Issue 1, Spr 2009, p13-14, por
Full Text: