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4 results for Recall Vol. 3 Issue 2, Oct 1997
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Record #:
21215
Author(s):
Abstract:
British forces made two attempts to control North and South Carolina during the first two years of the American Revolution. Both failed. From 1775 to 1778, the northern colonies bore the brunt of most of the major fighting. With fighting in the north stalemated late in 1778, British commanders again looked southward. Ripley recounts the fighting in the South up to 1781, much of which was a bitter, violent civil war between Tories and American militia, with little participation by British soldiers.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Oct 1997, p1-5, por, map
Record #:
21234
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Battle of Moore's Creek Bridge, February 27, 1776, was a complete victory for the Patriots over the Scottish Highlanders and their Tory allies. It gave a tremendous morale boost to the other colonies. Desperately needed equipment was captured, including 35 guns, 1,500 excellent rifles, and medicine and surgical supplies. The Patriots also captured 800 prisoners. Significantly, the Patriot victory brought an end to royal rule in North Carolina.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Oct 1997, p5-6, bibl
Record #:
21276
Abstract:
The partisan warfare that took place in North Carolina during the Revolutionary War is both fascinating and disturbing. However, it is beyond the range and scope of this article which concentrates on the people and events of the Upper Cape River Valley between 1781-1782. Harrington attempts \"to explain this significant historical event in terms of what it was, when and where it occurred, who participated and why, the nature of the conflict and, most importantly, its impact both on society in the near term as well as the subsequent history of the area.\"
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Oct 1997, p9-14, map, bibl
Record #:
21275
Abstract:
General Martin D. Hardin of Kentucky spoke with Isaac Shelby in 1815 and again in 1819 about the Battle of King's Mountain. The notes he took were later communicated to the American Review in 1848 by his son John J. Hardin and are included in this article.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Oct 1997, p7-9, por, map