NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


5 results for Sparrow, W. Keats
Currently viewing results 1 - 5
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
798
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina boasts the longest literary heritage in English of any state, a distinguished heritage that begins before the first colonial narratives. Sparrow presents a syllabus of NC works that constitute this heritage.
Record #:
6808
Author(s):
Abstract:
Writing of eastern North Carolina fish stews, Sparrow comments, “like their cousin pig pickin's, they are highly ritualized and symbolic social events.” He describes the ingredients, the preparation, the serving of the stew, the accompanying components of the meal, and where folks gather to eat it.
Source:
Record #:
19768
Author(s):
Abstract:
The fish stews created in eastern North Carolina are more than just an ordinary folk meal. Similar in meaning to a pig picking, fish stews are highly ritualized and symbolic social events. A festive but informal meal, fish stews are often prepared for large crowds who gather to enjoy one another's company while the meal cooks. The unpretentiousness of the meal reflects favorably to a people who value reality over appearances.
Source:
North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. Issue 12, 2003, p130-132, il, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
21234
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Battle of Moore's Creek Bridge, February 27, 1776, was a complete victory for the Patriots over the Scottish Highlanders and their Tory allies. It gave a tremendous morale boost to the other colonies. Desperately needed equipment was captured, including 35 guns, 1,500 excellent rifles, and medicine and surgical supplies. The Patriots also captured 800 prisoners. Significantly, the Patriot victory brought an end to royal rule in North Carolina.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Oct 1997, p5-6, bibl
Record #:
3172
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the antebellum period, writers in the state were read around the country. Popular topics were poetry, native Americans, slavery, and plantation life. George Higby Throop's BERTIE is an example of the plantation novel.
Source: