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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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Record #:
29607
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Museum will display a selection of prints by Edvard Munch which focus on the symbolism in his work. Munch was a Norwegian artist whose paintings, drawings, and prints draw the viewer into his inner world of raw emotion and anxiety. Munch explored themes such of love and jealousy, loneliness and anxiety, and sickness and death in his work through symbolism. This exhibition looks at Munch’s achievement as a printmaker and was one of the most influential and prolific printmakers of the modern era.
Source:
Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Fall 2012, p14-17
Record #:
29608
Author(s):
Abstract:
A Discerning eye: Julian T. Baker Jr. Photography Collection The photography collection of Julian T. Baker, Jr. of Raleigh was recently acquired by the museum and will be on display through December. Baker’s collection is one of over 700 photographs spanning from 1903 to 2005 and focuses primarily on black and white images. His collection includes works from celebrated photographers such as Ansel Adams, Brett Easton, Alfred Stieglitz, and Dorothea Lange.
Source:
Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Fall 2012, p20-21, il
Record #:
29611
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Museum’s most recent acquisition is Jennifer Steinkamp’s video installation titled Mike Kelley. The image of Steinkamp’s dancing tree is one of the first works visitors see when entering the West Building and has quickly become one of the most popular and captivating works of art at the Museum. The artist uses light, color, and movement to create an image inspired by the natural world, but created using 3-D computer animation software. Projected on a wall, the tree cycles through the four seasons in eight minutes and invites viewers to immerse themselves in the work by taking the time to watch it change.
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Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Fall 2010, p20-21
Record #:
29609
Author(s):
Abstract:
The inaugural exhibition in the Museum’s new North Carolina Gallery is titled Inverted Utopias and features 20 key works by Bob Trotman. North Carolina artist Trotman began his career as a furniture maker before transitioning to a full-time sculpture artist in 1997. Trotman’s painted and carved-wood portraits depict people at dramatic transitional moments on the brink of change. His works are often both humorous and unsettling and in unusual positions.
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Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Fall 2010, p6-11
Record #:
29612
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jaume Plensa’s Doors of Jerusalem I, II, & III greet visitors as they enter the Museum’s West Building. The three larger figures are mounted high on the wall, are translucent, and are lit from within with words covering their bodies. The words are from the Song of Solomon found in the Bible and the names of the eight gates of the walled city of Jerusalem cover the figures mouths. The figures are described as contemporary gargoyles or celestial beings and their composition and the artist’s style are detailed here.
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Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Fall 2010, p22-23
Record #:
29610
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Museum will display the work of Norman Rockwell in an upcoming exhibition. 40 original paintings and 323 Saturday Evening Post covers will be on display. Rockwell was influential in shaping the nation’s self-image during the twentieth-century through his illustrations in media publications. Rockwell’s art is noted for its humor and portrayal of everyday life. Rockwell’s style and criticism of his work are discussed in this preview of the exhibition.
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Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Fall 2010, p12-17
Record #:
29621
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fannie and Alan Leslie bequeathed 30 paintings to the Museum and 13 paintings from their collection are currently on display. The Leslie Collection paintings are examples of modern American art and include major works by leading Southern California modernists. In a preview of the exhibition, the works and styles of artists Stanton Macdonald-Wright, Hans Burkhardt, and Lee Mullican are detailed.
Source:
Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Winter 2008, p6-9, il
Record #:
29623
Author(s):
Abstract:
The exhibition Far from Home features work by artists of diverse national, cultural, and spiritual backgrounds. The exhibit also includes works of art that address the displacement of people and populations in the global community as they relocate for economic, political, education, or familial reasons. All of the artists featured have relocated and their art often reflects this event and the distance they feel from their homes. The exhibit explores how being displaced affects creativity and one’s identity.
Source:
Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Winter 2008, p10-11, il
Record #:
29632
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Museum recently acquired a pair of 18th century Torah finials as a gift from the Friends of the Judaic Art Gallery. The finials are ornamental handles which are attached to wooden staves and rollers to help open scrolls which contain Jewish scripture. This pair was originally made for the Grote Synagogue in Amsterdam, Netherlands. The finials survived plundering from the Nazis during World War II while many other items in the Grote Synagogue did not. The finials, their use, their history, and their acquisition are all detailed.
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Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Winter 2008, p12-13
Record #:
29633
Author(s):
Abstract:
The work a curator does at the North Carolina Museum of Art is detailed. Curators spend time looking at auction house catalogues, traveling to visit galleries and meet with artists, establish relationships with reputable art dealers, collectors, art galleries, and artists in order to acquire art for the Museum. Once they have identified a work of art they wish to acquire, the curators must go through a system of checks and balances in order to purchase the work. The system of checks and balances at the Museum is discussed and several curators from the Museum detail the work that they do.
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Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Winter 2008, p14
Record #:
29634
Author(s):
Abstract:
The most frequent question asked by children at the Museum’s educational sessions is how they get the art inside the building. The process for how art arrives at the Museum is detailed here. The moving of artwork is well-planned, well-controlled, and well-insured. Most art comes through the loading dock at the Museum and requires a team to oversee the process and art already at the Museum is transported from building-to-building via an underground tunnel.
Source:
Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Winter 2008, p15
Record #:
29645
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the new exhibit Far From Home, the idea of disorientation and opportunity play a large role. The exhibition features works of modern art which focus on the idea of home. This idea of home could center on a family dwelling, geographic location, or culture and the complicated sense of origin and belonging our modern world has created.
Source:
Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Winter 2008, p6-9
Record #:
29695
Author(s):
Abstract:
The first installation of community art projects that will be visible upon entering the Museum is detailed. Local artists Mathew Curran, Bart Cusick, and Vic Knight created a mural inspired by 19th century landscapes from the Impressionism movement. Their mural includes stencils of Renoir, Sargent, and Monet with swirling colors and images from Hawthorne’s Highland Light (about 1925) and Spencer’s The White Tenement (1913) included. Several times a year the space will feature new community art installations by local artists.
Source:
Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Spring 2008, p15
Record #:
29694
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Museum of art knows the value of provenance. The painting Madonna and Child by Andrea Del Sarto (1486-1531) was suspected of being stolen by the Nazis in World War II only three years after discovering their painting Madonna and Child in a Landscape by Lucas Cranach was stolen by the Nazis. After being approached by a claimant who wanted to seize the suspected stolen Del Sarto painting, the Museum conducted an investigation to verify the painting’s provenance. The painting was found to have been legitimately sold by its owner and purchased by the Museum. After questions about provenance, the Museum has hired an expert to examine its collection and fill in any gaps in the history of ownership of its works.
Source:
Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Spring 2008, p14
Record #:
29693
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many of the works of art at the North Carolina Museum were owned by men and women of power, royalty, wealth, and nobility. The Bear Hunt (1639-40) by Peter Paul Rubens and Frans Synders was owned by King Philip IV of Spain and was commissioned by the king to hang in his summer palace, the Alcazar, in Madrid. The history of ownership of Thomas Hart Benton’s Spring on the Missouri, and Cornelis de Vos’ and Peter Paul Reubens’ Philip IV are also detailed. The topic of art ownership and how it affects the value of a work of art is also discussed.
Source:
Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Spring 2008, p10-11