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4 results for Our State Vol. 83 Issue 8, January 2016
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Record #:
24784
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Abstract:
In the early twentieth century, Tarboro became the first city in the country to operate a municipal milk plant. In 1917, many townspeople became sick due to contaminated milk, prompting Edgecombe County health officer Dr. K.E. Miller to lobby the town commission to open a municipal milk plant. By the end of 1918, the city raised enough money to build the plant, which stayed open for 47 years and inspired other cities across the country to pasteurize milk for their citizens.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 8, January 2016, p30, 32, 35, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
24786
Author(s):
Abstract:
Luck’s cannery in Randolph County got its start in 1947 when Alfred Spencer partnered with Ivey Luck to build the cannery in Seagrove, North Carolina. The company got a slow start, but with the help of local radio broadcaster, Tommy Floyd, Luck’s became a household name. The company has faced many changes over the years, including the addition of more products and selling the company to Arizona Canning Company in 2011.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 8, January 2016, p108-110, 112, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
24785
Author(s):
Abstract:
Boone attracts a number of visitors each year, but more often than not, the reasons these tourists come to Boone is to enjoy nature. Author and Boone resident, Leigh Ann Henion believes that Boone’s personality lies in its precipitation, for precipitation constantly shapes and changes the landscape.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 8, January 2016, p56, 58, 60,62-63, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
24787
Abstract:
In 1954, Whiteville funeral director A.D. Peacock discovered seven children living in dire conditions without any familial support. This experience prompted Peacock to found what is today known as the Boys & Girls Homes of North Carolina, a permanent residence program for at-risk children.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 8, January 2016, p122-123, il, por Periodical Website
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