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11 results for Our State Vol. 78 Issue 11, Apr 2011
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Record #:
13814
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A bolt of lightning burns at 50,000 degrees Fahrenheit. When it strikes a sandy beach, it forms a hardened mass of matter called fulgurite. Most people see a gray lump lying on the beach. It's not very attractive and looks like leftover concrete. Phil Greene, who lives in Nags Head on the Outer Banks, collects fulgurite. Hudson discusses what attracts him to this petrified energy.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 11, Apr 2011, p106-112, 114-117, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
13808
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Charlotte musician Arthur Smith celebrates his ninetieth birthday this month. In the state's history of country music singers, songwriters, and entertainers, he is one of the most admired and influential of them all. Thomason discusses his influence on North Carolina music.
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13813
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Vito and Mary Ellen Sico began collecting antiques for their home. Soon their collection became a business that later inspired the Liberty Antiques Festival. This festival is held twice-a-year and attracts hundreds of vendors and thousands of shoppers from almost two dozen states.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 11, Apr 2011, p94-96, 98, 100-102, 104-105 Periodical Website
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Record #:
13812
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Fiddlers and fiddling have been an integral part of the American South for three centuries. North Carolina is home to many fiddling festivals each year. Litchfield features three of them - Shakori Hills, Mount Airy, and Union Grove, the granddaddy of them all.
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Record #:
13811
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In many colonial towns, taverns were the only public building other than the courthouse. Using the Eagle Tavern, located in historic Halifax, Frye describes the many activities and services that a tavern could provide to citizens and travelers.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 11, Apr 2011, p40-46, 48, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
13809
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Emoke B'Racz opened Malaprop's Bookstore in 1982. It is Asheville's signature bookstore and helped pioneer the city's downtown business revival.
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Record #:
13810
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Our State magazine features Southern Pines, located in Moore County, in its Tar Heel Town of the Month section.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 11, Apr 2011, p28-32, 34, 36-38, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
13857
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Talmadge Moose grew up in Stanly County during the 1930s and 40s. The first member of his family to go to college, he changed his major to follow his first love, art. His work earned him a national reputation, but his creations never strayed far from his roots. Ruth Moose remembers her husband in this OUR STATE article.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 11, Apr 2011, p160-162, 164, 166, 168, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
13856
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William McNeill is a collector of handheld fans. His collection includes fans from churches, funeral homes, and businesses and spans nearly six generations.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 11, Apr 2011, p138-140, 142, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
38293
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How he fulfills the roles of preservationist and collector: amassing items such as 18th-century Kentucky longrifles, 19th-century salt-glaze pottery, furniture from the 18th century; amassing stories of the people who made these items. In the process, he saves the items and their history, almost palpable beneath their materials, not for just his own pleasure or fulfillment. The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts and individuals who share his twin passions may have such item available for generations to come.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 11, Apr 2011, p128-130, 132, 134-135 Periodical Website
Record #:
38292
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Diane Aurit’s face jug collection and financial investment grows in tandem with her fascination with the history, the process behind their creation, and varieties of facial design. Famed face jug potters represented in her collection of 240 jars include Charlie Lisk, Don Craig, Burlon Craig, Kim Ellington, Steven Abee, and Joe Reinhardt.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 11, Apr 2011, p120-122, 124, 126 Periodical Website