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10 results for Our State Vol. 74 Issue 7, Dec 2006
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Record #:
8347
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Schultz discusses the history of the bookmobile in North Carolina. In the late 1880s, Dr. Charles Hallet Wing retired from MIT and moved to Mitchell County. He later opened a free school and a 12,000 volume library. Wing kept around six dozen of his books in constant rotation through Avery, Mitchell, and Yancey counties. This circulation helped to pioneer the bookmobile movement. The state received its first official bookmobile in Durham in 1923, and by 1956, there were 101 bookmobiles operating in 94 counties. Over 100 years after the movement began, bookmobiles continue their task of bringing books to North Carolinians.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 7, Dec 2006, p25-26, 28, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8349
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The North Carolina Symphony celebrates its seventy-fifth anniversary this season. In a tribute to the symphony, six of the state's composers contributed works to a new series entitled POSTCARDS FROM NORTH CAROLINA. The composers--Paul Elwood, Kenneth Frazelle, the late Roger Hannay, Stephen Jaffe, Anthony Kelley, and Robert Ward--were commissioned to write four-to-six minute pieces that convey what the North Carolina experience means to them. Sauls discusses the compositions.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 7, Dec 2006, p48-50, 52, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8348
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In this ongoing series about favorite Southern foods, Garner looks into the breadbasket and discovers biscuits and cornbread. He includes several recipes on how to prepare them and lists two eating establishments that serve these two favorites: the Farmer's Market Restaurant (Raleigh) and Bunn's Barbecue (Windsor).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 7, Dec 2006, p36-38, 40, 42, 44-47, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8358
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Ahoskie, located in Hertford County, is NORTH CAROLINA magazine's featured Tar Heel town of the month. The name is Native American in origin, although it is not exactly known from which tribe it derives. The name first appeared in official records in 1722, and the town incorporated in 1893. Ahoskie is home to the Atlantic District Harness Racing Track, the only legally sanctioned harness racing track in the state. Significant revitalization is taking place in the downtown section. Mug Shotz, a café and coffee shop, has opened. The historic Garrett Hotel is partially renovated and houses new shops and service businesses. Built in 1906, the historic Gallery Theatre has been completely restored, and three or four shows are performed here each year.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 7, Dec 2006, p18-20, 22-23, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8350
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The start of the Christmas season in Salisbury begins with Catawba College's presentation of Lessons and Carols. The performance, an annual event for the past twenty years, is performed in the 900-seat Omwake-Dearborn Chapel, located on the college campus. The performance became so popular that a second service was added in 1998. Tickets are distributed in November, and admission is always free.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 7, Dec 2006, p76-78, 80-82, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8360
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During the Christmas season, Marine Corps Reservists dedicate themselves to bringing happiness to underprivileged children through the Toys for Toys program. The program started in 1947, in Los Angles, California, when Marine Corps Major Bill Hendricks led a group of fellow Marines in collecting and distributing toys. In 1948, the program went national. All Marine Corps Reserve units in North Carolina participate. The Marines receive assistance from local motorcycle clubs, which donate toys or funds, and from corporate sponsors. NBC affiliate WITN-TV in Washington, Beaufort County, has been a program participant for twenty years. In 2005, forty thousand toys were distributed to twenty thousand eastern North Carolina children.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 7, Dec 2006, p124-126, 128, 130-131, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8361
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Funds to repair and conserve items of historical significance are an ongoing need of museums. The Orange County Historical Museum in Hillsborough and the North Carolina Museum of History in Raleigh have taken a unique approach toward solving this problem. The Adopt an Artifact program allows individuals an opportunity to adopt or sponsor an artifact of their choice for conservation. There is no minimum or maximum amount to donate, and the donations are tax-deductible. The Orange County Museum was the first to start the program several years ago, and the state museum followed in 2006. Pittard discusses how the program operates and the items that have been adopted or need to be adopted.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 7, Dec 2006, p162-164, 166, 168, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8362
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Fred Hughes began publication of The SENTINEL newspaper in Marshall in 1999. He soon purchased his competitor, the NEWS-RECORD, which had been published in Madison County for one hundred years, and combined the two papers into a weekly publication called the NEWS-RECORD & SENTINEL. Before he retired, Hughes, a railroad buff, moved his newspaper enterprise into two boxcars. The boxcars are appropriate also because Marshall's history is intimately connected to the railroad. The newspaper is thought to be the only newspaper in the world that is produced inside boxcars.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 7, Dec 2006, p170-172, 174, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8363
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Wilmington artist Mary Ellen Golden began painting in heavy oils and moved on to acrylics. While she was living in Charleston, SC, the celebrated Charleston watercolorist Virginia Fouche Bolton became her friend and mentor. Since then, Golden has never painted in either oils or acrylics. The soft pastel watercolors she now uses portray the coastal scenes that have surrounded her since childhood.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 7, Dec 2006, p176-180, 182, 184, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8359
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Tomlin takes the reader on a photographic tour of some of North Carolina's historic churches, ranging from a grandiose cathedral to a humble meetinghouse. A brief sketch of each church's history accompanies each photograph. Churches include St. Philips Anglican Church (Brunswick); Machpelah Presbyterian Church (Lincoln County); and West Grove Friends Meeting House (Alamance County).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 7, Dec 2006, p92-98, 100, il Periodical Website
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