NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


8 results for Moore, Carole
Currently viewing results 1 - 8
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
7192
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Hill-Jones Octagon House in Cedar Point near Swansboro stands on a 60-acre tract of land. The house was donated to the Masons in 2001 by descendants of the original builders. The 5,000-square-foot house, built in 1856, has eight pie-shaped rooms and four square rooms. The house was headquarters for the Union Army during the Civil War. In 1996, two hurricanes took off the roof and severely damaged the interior. Then woodpeckers invaded. The Masons are currently restoring the house. In time they will build a summer camp on the grounds for the children's home they support in Oxford and later a village for retired Masons.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 12, May 2005, p102-105, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
8363
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wilmington artist Mary Ellen Golden began painting in heavy oils and moved on to acrylics. While she was living in Charleston, SC, the celebrated Charleston watercolorist Virginia Fouche Bolton became her friend and mentor. Since then, Golden has never painted in either oils or acrylics. The soft pastel watercolors she now uses portray the coastal scenes that have surrounded her since childhood.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 7, Dec 2006, p176-180, 182, 184, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
8666
Author(s):
Abstract:
In November 1775, Lord Dunmore, Virginia's last Royal Governor, planned to invade North Carolina. After capturing Portsmouth and Norfolk, he barricaded Great Bridge on the Carolina side, blocking all shipments to the Norfolk port. A small force of Americans marched on Great Bridge. Seeking reinforcements for the outnumbered American troops, Betsy Dowdy from Currituck Banks rode her horse, Black, Bess fifty miles on the night of December 10, 1775, to alert General William Skinner and his men at Hertford. Skinner's force reached Great Bridge in time to help defeat Dunmore on December 11, 1775, and end the invasion threat. Moore discusses how people from colonial times down to the present have reacted to the ride. Some feel it actually happened; some, that the account does not jibe with the facts; and some, that it was a combination of a little truth and a little myth.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 5, Oct 2007, p76-78, 80, il, map Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
9837
Author(s):
Abstract:
By day Stephen Zawistowski is a law enforcement officer in Jacksonville. By night he brings out the hidden beauty inside old metal, fashioning it into functional works such as tables, gates, and cabinets.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 10, Mar 2008, p158-160, 162, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
10542
Author(s):
Abstract:
Moore discusses the work of Beaufort artist, Jack Saylor.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 76 Issue 7, Dec 2008, p148-150, 152, 154, 156, il, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
11030
Author(s):
Abstract:
Moore discusses the Greenville Choral Society which is celebrating its fortieth year of creating music for themselves and the community.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 76 Issue 11, Apr 2009, p120-123, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
6588
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wilson Bay is a cove in the Neuse River in Onslow County. Jacksonville residents made it a priority to cleanup the filthy, contaminated 126-acre bay from which most aquatic life had disappeared and which waterfowl had abandoned for better feeding grounds. The cleanup solution, offered by Jay Levine, associate professor of epidemiology and public health at North Carolina State University, was to introduce oysters into the brackish waters. Moore discusses this approach and its results.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
7606
Abstract:
During World War II, the American armed services were mostly segregated. In 1943, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 8802, which forced the commandant of the Marine Corps to admit African Americans. Almost 20,000 African Americans signed up and went through basic training between 1943 and 1949. Moore recounts some of their experiences in this period of racial segregation.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 8, Jan 2006, p88-90, 92, 94, il Periodical Website
Full Text: