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14 results for Our State Vol. 74 Issue 3, Aug 2006
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Record #:
7991
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The history of Kannapolis in Cabarrus County during the 20th-century is closely tied to the Cannon Manufacturing Company. James William Cannon started construction of his mill in 1906. At his death in 1921, 12 plants in the Kannapolis complex employed 15,000 workers, who were producing over 300,000 towels a day. The mills employed several generations of mill workers. In 1985, the plants were sold, and after passing through several owners, closed permanently in 2003. Nearly 4,800 workers in Cabarrus and Rowan counties were laid off. County leaders began a search for new projects. Since 2003, over 350 new jobs have come to Kannapolis, along with $25 million in new investments. The biggest project is the North Carolina Research Campus. This $1 billion biotechnology center, opening in 2010, will be one of the most advanced facilities of its type in the world.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 3, Aug 2006, p18-20, 22, 24-25, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
7992
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On April 21, 1913, a meteorite slammed into Moore County about three miles from the town of Carthage. It was not very big, weighing slightly over four pounds and measuring about the size of a large man's fist. George Calvin Graves, who owned the land where the meteorite landed, took it home, and there it remained for the next twenty-one years. In 1934, Harry T. Davis, curator of geology at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences came to see it and later took it to the Smithsonian Institution. Over the years scientists around the world have studied the “Moore County,” seeking to learn more about its origin and composition. Meteorites are named for places where they are found. Part of the Moore County meteorite is now in the Smithsonian Institution, and the remainder is in the NC Museum of Natural Sciences.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 3, Aug 2006, p27-29, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7990
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The Bovender family of Rutherford County, Tim, Nell, and children Will and Ali, are the 2006 North Carolina Farm Conservation Family of the Year. The farm began in 1768 as a 200-acre land grant from King George III and has grown into a 1,000-acre one. The award is given annually by the North Carolina Division of Soil and Water Conservation and recognizes farmers who implement conservation-friendly techniques on their farms, often at great personal expense. Placing one-third of the farm under a conservation easement and installing 45,000 feet of fencing to keep cows out of streams that flow through the farm are two conservation things the family has done.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 3, Aug 2006, p122-124, 126, 128, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7988
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Many North Carolinians are collectors of standard objects, like coins, stamps, or baseball cards. Tomlin introduces four individuals whose collections are a bit different. They are Marie Lawrence of Morehead City, who collects deviled-egg plates; Mace Quidley of Camden, a collector of vintage gas pumps; Bill Michal of High Point, who collects antique banjos; and Jerome Gundrum of Snead's Ferry, a collector of root beer memorabilia.
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Record #:
7989
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Agriculture is the state's top industry, and through the years a number of men and women have been pioneers in the science and art of agriculture and have served as leaders and ambassadors of the agricultural community. The North Carolina Agricultural Hall of Fame, created in 1953, honors the accomplishments of thirty-three men and women. Members include Leonidas L. Polk, Jane S. McKimmon, W. Kerr Scott, Benjamin W. Kilgore, and Ruth A. Current.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 3, Aug 2006, p82-84, 86, 88, 90, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7987
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In this ongoing series of favorite Southern dishes, Garner discusses the delights of barbecue and the distinct styles of preparing and serving it that developed in the Coastal Plain and in the Piedmont. He lists several eating establishments that serve good barbecue: Grady's Barbecue (Dudley); Cook's Barbecue (Lexington); and Troutman's Barbecue (Denton).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 3, Aug 2006, p36-38, 40, 42-43, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8001
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On the Dan River in the 1800s, the bateau was the choice of residents for shipping and receiving goods. The bateau, a double-ended, flat-bottomed vessel with a wide hull, can measure up to 60 feet with a capacity for carrying 10,000 pounds of cargo. Propulsion is man-powered by a crew of three. One sits in the back and works the tiller, while the other two plunge long poles down to the river bottom, push their weight against them, and walk from one end of the bateau to the other. The first bateau appeared on the Dan in 1792. Three Rivers Outfitters of Eden has revived this relic of the 19th-century. The company's 40-foot replica takes passengers on a one-mile voyage from Eden Wildlife Access to Leaksville Landing. Gigley recounts his experiences on the voyage.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 3, Aug 2006, p174-176, 178, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7998
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The Etheridge family came from the mainland to Roanoke Island in 1799 to establish a farmstead. The farm remained in the family's possession until descendants sold it in 1988 to Outer Banks Conservationists, a private, nonprofit organization incorporated to protect and preserve historic sites. A rustic shell of a single-gable, five-room house, ringed with empty outbuildings, is the only reminder of almost 200 years of the family's presence. Restoration began in 1999. The conservation group will operate the Etheridge farm and land as a living history interpretation site of a 19th-century, eastern North Carolina coastal farm.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 3, Aug 2006, p108-110, 112, 114-115, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7995
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Famed maritime artist Robert Dance discusses his work. Dance was born in Tokyo, where his father was a businessman. Eight years ago he moved from Winston-Salem to Kinston. His reputation as a maritime artist is nationwide, and he is especially famous in New England. Bound for Blue Water, J. Russell Jinishian's recently published book of past and present American nautical painters, lists Dance among the best American marine artists of the 20th-century and into the 21st-century. Dance's works hang in the North Carolina Museum of Art; the Mystic Seaport Museum in Mystic, Connecticut; and numerous corporate and private collections.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 3, Aug 2006, p166-168, 170, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7999
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Organic farming, or farming without chemical pesticides or synthetic fertilizers, is a growing trend in North Carolina. With the decline of the tobacco economy, there is a movement toward producing a wide range of foods locally and organically. The Blue Ridge Community College in Flat Rock held its first Organic Growers School in 1994. Over the next few years one or two hundred people attended the one-day event. In 2006, the event drew 1,100 people from North Carolina and fourteen other states. The school featured fifty-six class sessions in fourteen tracks from soil science to marketing, nine half-day workshops, a full-day children's program, and three vendor talks.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 3, Aug 2006, p116-118, 120-121, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7997
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Where and how 4-H clubs started is unknown since many states claim they started some club of this kind. In North Carolina, 4-H traces its official roots back to a corn club that was organized in Hertford County in 1909 to teach boys farming practices. Guided by Jane S. McKimmon, 4-H clubs for girls were being organized by 1911. Clubs for African-American youth formed in 1914. The various clubs became officially known as 4-H on January 1, 1926. By 1952, North Carolina led the nation in membership, with over 140,000 members enrolled in 2,280 4-H clubs. Westbrook discusses the focus of 4-H clubs through the years.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 3, Aug 2006, p100-102,104-106, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8000
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In 1906, three doctors opened the Thermal Belt Sanatorium in Tryon for people suffering respiratory illnesses. The physicians soon discovered that more healthy people than ill ones were coming to Tryon for the climate, and they closed the sanatorium. In 1917, Carter Brown came from Michigan to explore the possibilities of opening an inn. He rented the sanatorium for two years as his residence, and in 1920, purchased and converted it into an inn. This year the structure, now known far and wide as the Pine Crest Inn, is celebrating a century of service. Jackson recounts the history of the inn from 1920 to 2006.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 3, Aug 2006, p148-150, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7993
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Morris describes five North Carolina farms where conventional crops were traded for alternatives uses of acreage. They are Spinning Spider Creamery, producing goat cheese in Marshall; Whistlepig Farm, growing specialty garlic in Asheville; Chapel Hill Creamery, producing cheese from grass-fed cows in Chapel Hill; Harbinger Lavender Farm, growing varieties of lavender in Harbinger; and Bradsher Sod Farm, growing fescue in Raleigh.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 3, Aug 2006, p136-138, 140, 142, 144, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7994
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People who enjoy books often gather in groups to discuss what they are reading. Molinary discusses three books clubs that have existed for over a century and one newly-formed one. They are the Tarboro Magazine Club (Tarboro, 1895); The Travelers Club (Hickory, 1890); Tuesday Afternoon Reading Club (Reidsville, 1897); and Waiting for Maya (Davidson, 1992).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 3, Aug 2006, p152-155, il, bibl Periodical Website
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