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17 results for Our State Vol. 73 Issue 4, Sept 2005
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Record #:
7366
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For over a century tobacco was king in Durham. Then the factories that produced smoking tobacco and cigarettes closed in 1987. For almost two decades the sixteen-acre property with nine buildings and over one million square feet of space declined into dilapidated warehouses with sagging roofs and broken windows. Now new tenants are moving in. The Capitol Broadcasting Company and its chief executive officer, Jim Goodmon, have begun a $200 million project which is called the largest historical renovation in the history of North Carolina. Paige describes how this area is becoming a place to live, work, and play. New tenants of the American Tobacco Historic District include GlaxoSmithKline, Duke University, restaurants, and upscale condominiums.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 4, Sept 2005, p38-40, 42, 44, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7363
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Oxford in Granville County is OUR STATE magazine's featured Tar Heel town of the month. The town has a wealth of 19th- and early 20th-century homes, many of which have been restored. Located within a short drive of Durham and Raleigh, Oxford has a vital downtown business district and a tobacco-farming heritage. For years the population has remained under 10,000. This will change soon as construction has begun on Oxford Park, a 1,500 home development.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 4, Sept 2005, p18-20, 22-23, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
7365
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Herpetologists catch and study reptiles and amphibians, and for the past twenty years, this has been Jeff Beane's career. Beane, the Herpetology Collections Manager at the North Carolina State Museum of Natural Sciences in Raleigh, received a degree in zoology from North Carolina State University in 1982. He discusses how his interest in this area developed and his current job activities.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 4, Sept 2005, p30-32, 34, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7364
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The Great North Carolina Hurricane of 1815, as it came to be known, made landfall on September 3, 1815, along the Onslow County coast. Hairr recounts the destructive path the storm took through eastern North Carolina before exiting out to sea in the vicinity of Norfolk, Virginia.
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7362
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Caldwell describes three western North Carolina bed and breakfast inns that were once private residences. They are the Mountain Magnolia Inn and Retreat (Hot Springs); the Lovill House Inn (Boone); and the Turn of the Century Bed and Breakfast (Salisbury).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 4, Sept 2005, p52-54, 56, 59, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7367
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Chapel Hill artist, Dr. Pamela George, and Triangle-area calligrapher Dr. Walter M. Brown have created a North Carolina Alphabet, consisting of one painting of each letter of the alphabet. Each picture bears the image of an animal, plant, place, or thing that can be found in the state. When put together the painting measures a mural-sized eight feet wide by six feet tall. Since the painting's completion, Carolina Wren Press has turned it into a children's book which will be published in September 2005. The publishing company will also publish a learner's poster of the alphabet for home and classroom use.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 4, Sept 2005, p46-48, 50, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7372
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The Bechtlers, Christopher, son Augustus, and nephew Christopher, Jr., German immigrants, arrived in New York in 1829. After a short stay in Philadelphia, they moved to Rutherford County in 1830. Experienced in making watches and jewelry, they saw that the economy was hindered because little gold was in circulation. Rutherford County at that time was the geographic center of gold mining in the nation, and the Bechtlers opened a mint, which operated from 1831 to 1840. Over $2 million in gold coins was minted and used during that period. The money boosted industry and helped people to buy and sell goods.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 4, Sept 2005, p130-132, 134, 1136, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7375
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Monarch butterflies begin their migration to Mexico from southern Canada and the eastern United States in late August. Many of the 100 million travelers will not complete the 3,000-mile journey, but their descendants will. Females lay eggs along the route, then die. The eggs hatch into the larval stage, then through all stages, till the new butterflies emerges. It may take several generations to reach Mexico and several to make it back to Canada, where the cycle begins again. In mid-September the monarchs pass through North Carolina. The best areas to view them are along the beaches and the gaps along the Blue Ridge Parkway and other mountain roads.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 4, Sept 2005, p158-160, 162, 164, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7371
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In 1987, the Museum of World Cultures at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington created the North Carolina Living Treasure award. The award is modeled after a similar program in Japan which holds up for national recognition the creative work of an individual. The award is one of the highest honors given in North Carolina to honor creative excellence. Since 1987, eleven North Carolinians have been honored with the award. Recipients include potters, a boat builder, glass and wood artists, musical instrument makers, and a gunsmith.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 4, Sept 2005, p118-120, 122, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7374
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The North Carolina Collection Gallery, located in Wilson Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, has an extensive collection of all forms of currency in its Numismatic Collection. The collection of almost 10,000 items includes private bank notes, chits, gold coins, tokens, scrip, bonds, paper currencies, treasury notes, and stocks.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 4, Sept 2005, p140-142, 144, il Periodical Website
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7369
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Under the soil of North Carolina lies a treasure trove of amazing and ancient fossils. The state's oldest fossil, the pteridinium, dates from 550 million years ago and was found in Stanly County. Fossils are found in the state from the Appalachian Mountains to the Atlantic Ocean shoreline. Marine fossils are found east of I-95, with the town of Aurora being a treasure trove for shark teeth and other marine life. Dinosaurs are found only in two areas in the southeastern part of the state.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 4, Sept 2005, p94-96, 98-99, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7373
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University of North Carolina at Charlotte professor Jamie Franki was one of four artists selected nationwide to design images for the U.S. Mint's Westward Journey Nickel Series. Franki's depiction of an American bison appears on one of the four coins released to commemorate the bicentennials of the Louisiana Purchase and of the historic expedition of Lewis and Clark.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 4, Sept 2005, p124-126, 128, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7368
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North Carolina has a rich history of stories of buried treasure. Over the centuries many North Carolinians, armed with shovels, maps, or just word-of-mouth, have sought these riches. Blackburn discusses some of these treasure troves, including Blackbeard's gold, gold buried by Confederates near the end of the Civil War, and Money Island in Greenville Sound near Wrightsville Beach.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 4, Sept 2005, p84-86, 88, 90, 92, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7370
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Norris traces the history paper currency and coins issued in North Carolina from the time of the Lords Proprietors in 1694 through the Civil War.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 4, Sept 2005, p100-102, 104106, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7378
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Founded in 1921 by Socrates \"Dick\" Gliarmis, a native of Samos, Greece, Dick's Hot Dog Stand is a Wilson landmark. The restaurant has fed people in all walks of life who come to enjoy a hot dog flavored with a secret chili sauce. Lee Gliarmis inherited the business and continues the family tradition with the help of longtime employees and two of his children. Gliarmis intended to coach when he graduated from the University of North Carolina, but he was called home when his father became ill in 1950. The rest is history.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 4, Sept 2005, p194-196, il Periodical Website
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