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18 results for Our State Vol. 72 Issue 10, Mar 2005
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Record #:
7099
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Published for the first time in 1828 by John Christian Blum, BLUM'S ALMANAC is the oldest continually published magazine in the state. Blum was born in Bethabara in 1784 and later moved to Salem with his family. He was an agent for the Cape Fear Bank in Salem in 1827, when a fire destroyed the bank's treasury. Forced to seek new employment, Blum turned to printing. The content and format have remained the same through the years, including items like sun risings and settings, household and health hints, farming help, and proverbs on moral precepts. Circulation today is 500,000 copies, with 20,000 subscriptions.
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Record #:
7104
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Before America declared for independence, a group of Piedmont farmers challenged the royal government which was led by Governor William Tryon. The group was not seeking independence from England but reform of existing local governments. Among the complaints against local governments were excessive taxes, illegal fees, corrupt officials, and appointment by the Crown of local officials. Pittard discusses the Regulator Revolt, which culminated in a battle on May 14, 1771, on Alamance Creek between Royal forces and the Regulators and the subsequent hanging of six of the Regulators.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 10, Mar 2005, p68-70, 72-73, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7101
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From January 1 through December 31, 2005, the North Carolina Transportation Museum in Spencer is featuring an exhibit of the contributions women have made to transportation in North Carolina. Included in this exhibit are such women as Harriet Berry, Mary Nicholson, and Dorothy Hoover. Berry had a crucial role in passage of the state Highway Act of 1921. Nicholson was the first licensed female pilot in North Carolina. She flew with the British Air Transport Auxiliary during World War II and was killed in action in 1943. Hoover was a pilot with the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 10, Mar 2005, p36-38, 40, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7098
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Aberdeen in Moore County is Our State magazine's featured Tar Heel town of the month. The town was founded in the 1700s by Scottish Highlanders. Today the town is located in an area known as a first-grade golf destination. Besides golf, Aberdeen offers lakeside recreation, historic churches, a downtown historic district, and a view of ante-bellum-era farm life through the 1825 Malcolm Blue Farm, listed on the National Register of Historic Places. A variety of artists, scientists, and political figures have settled in Aberdeen over the years.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 10, Mar 2005, p18-20, 22-23, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
7105
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On Raleigh's Capitol Square stand over a dozen monuments that salute the courage of North Carolina men and women in wartime. The first of the fourteen statues was set in place in 1857, and the last in 1990. The statues include Women of the Confederacy, North Carolina Veterans' Monument, Vietnam Veterans' Memorial, Henry Lawson Wyatt, and Worth Bagley.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 10, Mar 2005, p124-126, 128, 130, 132, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7100
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Vernie Carpenter, who lives in Supply in Brunswick County, makes and repairs quilts. Over the years she has transformed her home into a quilting gallery and workshop. She makes all sizes of quilts for beds and wall hangings and makes them in a style typical of another era.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 10, Mar 2005, p30-32, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7102
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Grant describes three mountains inns that are a combination of romantic surroundings, tranquil atmosphere, and excellent food. They are the Folkestone Inn (Bryson City); Old Stone Inn (Waynesville); and the Mast Farm Inn (Valle Crucis).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 10, Mar 2005, p42-44, 46-47, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7106
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Jacob Edwin Keiger left his parent's Stokes County farm and enlisted as a private in Company D of the 53rd North Carolina Regiment during the Civil War. Within three years dozens of Company D's 120 men were wounded, over forty were captured and held as prisoners, twenty-one deserted, and thirty-five died, mostly from disease. Keiger and his parents exchanged over one hundred letters before his death, at 24, in Raleigh from disease in July 1863. Excerpts his letters, interspersed with narrative of the company's movements, create a picture of one soldier's life during the Civil War.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 10, Mar 2005, p74-76, 78, 80, 82-83, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7110
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At seventeen, most people are students in high school. On February 20, 1945, Plymouth native Jack Lucas was seventeen years old and in combat against the Japanese on Iwo Jima during World War II. Lucas was severely wounded when he threw himself on a grenade to protect his buddies. For his heroism President Harry S. Truman presented him the Medal of Honor, the highest award bestowed for valor in action against an enemy. Later in life he received North Carolina's prestigious Order of the Long Leaf Pine, and he was recognized during President William Jefferson Clinton's 1995 State of the Union address.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 10, Mar 2005, p94, 96, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7111
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Army nurse Mildred Clark of Bladen County was stationed at the U.S. Army Hospital at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, on December 7, 1941. During the war she held a number of administrative positions stateside. When the Korean War broke out, Clark was Chief Nurse of the Far East Command. Following that war, she again held a number of high-level administrative positions. When she retired with the rank of colonel in 1967, she was Chief of the Army Nurse Corps. Among her awards is the Distinguished Service Medal. She died in 1994 at the age of seventy-nine and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery. In 1999, the Clark Health Clinic at Fort Bragg was dedicated to her memory. It is the first building at the fort to be named in honor of a woman.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 10, Mar 2005, p98, 100, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7108
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The chances of three men who graduated from Four Oaks High School in the early 1940s reconnecting while serving abroad in World War II, would seem remote. The three Johnston County men, however, did meet again abroad. Earl Johnson was shot down in 1944. Douglas Johnson was shot down in 1943. Both were sent to the same prisoner-of-war camp. When the two men were liberated by American forces in May 1945, Donzia Bailey, serving with the 13th Armored Infantry Division, was among their liberators.
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Record #:
7112
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Boyd Allred and his brother James, from the small community of Liberty in Randolph County, joined the U.S. Army in 1948. When the Korean War broke out, both were sent to Korea. Both were captured by Chinese Communist soldiers and imprisoned. James was held for 999 days and Boyd for 961. The brothers recount their experiences in harsh prisoner of war camps.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 10, Mar 2005, p102-104, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7107
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Paul Green was a student at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill when the United States entered World War I in 1917. He put his studies aside and enlisted in the army. From the first day of his enlistment, he kept a diary of his experiences in this country and on the battlefields in Belgium. Using selections from Green's diary, Spence interspersed details from a conversation he had with the author in 1974, to create a picture of one soldier's life during World War I.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 10, Mar 2005, p84-86, 88-89, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7113
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In the spring of 1867, after recovering from a serious eye injury, John Muir was trekking across western North Carolina. He was a young man of twenty-nine, and his great fame as a conservationist lay years ahead of him. He recorded his travel experiences across the postwar South in THOUSAND-MILE WALK TO THE GULF, published in 1916. Nickens retraces Muir's journey through what is now the Joyce Kilmer Memorial Forest.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 10, Mar 2005, p136-139, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7114
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Beaufort artist Robert Irwin discusses his life and work with Morris. In the 1970s, he studied under George Bireline at the North Carolina State University School of Design. In the 1980s, he founded Images, Inc., a design and fabrication company that made high-end custom furniture. He later sold the company and moved to Beaufort in 1991, where he lives and paints.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 10, Mar 2005, p144-146, 148, il Periodical Website
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