NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


8 results for Memorials--Raleigh
Currently viewing results 1 - 8
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
4014
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Vietnam Veterans Memorial was dedicated on May 23, 1987, in Raleigh. Located on Union Square at the Capitol, it honors the 89,000 men and women in the state who served in the war. Over the years people have visited and left items, including units' insignias, medals, and dog tags. The items have formed a memorial collection of over 300 pieces.
Record #:
7105
Author(s):
Abstract:
On Raleigh's Capitol Square stand over a dozen monuments that salute the courage of North Carolina men and women in wartime. The first of the fourteen statues was set in place in 1857, and the last in 1990. The statues include Women of the Confederacy, North Carolina Veterans' Monument, Vietnam Veterans' Memorial, Henry Lawson Wyatt, and Worth Bagley.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 10, Mar 2005, p124-126, 128, 130, 132, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
15695
Abstract:
The North Carolina Historical Commission began a series of meetings to begin discussions about inclusion of State Capitol Memorials recognizing Native American, African American and women influential in the state's history. A committee is responsible to evaluate funds, merits, and space for additional plaques with input from the public.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
16858
Author(s):
Abstract:
The State Capitol grounds in Raleigh boast a range of monuments and statutes from confederate guns to depictions of World War I soldiers. Some of these memorials were cast in bronze which is not impermeable to the elements. Corrosion attacked these statues and a restoration plan was devised in 1981 by the State Capitol Foundation which raised the funds from several individuals and organizations to perform the necessary conservation.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
17155
Abstract:
Captain Samuel A'Court Ashe of Raleigh, who died recently just two weeks shy of his ninety-eighth birthday, was the last surviving officer of the Confederate Army. Battle discusses his career as well as bill proposed in the North Carolina Legislature to erect a memorial to him in Capitol Square in Raleigh.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 6 Issue 35, Jan 1939, p5, por
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
19538
Abstract:
The Aycock Memorial was built to honor state Governor Charles Brantley Aycock. Aycock Memorial Committee members unveiled the monument in Capitol Square, Raleigh on Thursday, March 13, 1924. A complete program of events and participants is included.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
4388
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Vietnam Veterans' Memorial, which stands on Union Square at the Capitol in Raleigh, was dedicated on May 23, 1987. It honors the 89,000 men and women from the state who served in the war. The bronze sculpture was designed by Abbe Godwin of Colfax and depicts two soldiers carrying a wounded comrade to a helicopter landing zone.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 30 Issue 1, Fall 1990, p41-44, il
Full Text:
Record #:
28989
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina State University’s Memorial Belltower was built to honor alumni who were killed in battle in World War I. The tower was designed by William Henry Deacy and construction began November 10, 1921. Currently, the belltower is often used as a gathering place for celebrations. The history of the memorial since WWI is detailed.
Source: