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12 results for Our State Vol. 71 Issue 12, May 2004
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6644
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Fearing that Federal troops would capture the Fresnel lens in the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, Confederate soldiers removed it in 1862 and shipped it inland to Washington, then Tarboro. With the Union threatening destruction of Washington if the lens wasn't returned, Dr. David Tayloe, who supported the Confederacy, assumed responsibility for the lens and carried it to safety by boxcar to his home in Townsville in what is now Vance County. Tayloe died in 1884. The whereabouts of the forty-four boxes containing the Fresnel lens have been one of the great mysteries of the Civil War. Thirty years ago Kevin Duffus set out to solve the 140-year-old mystery. He discusses his quest, which ended with the finding of the lens in 2002. In 2005, the Fresnel lens will go on display at the Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 12, May 2004, p100-102, 104-105, il, map Periodical Website
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6643
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The Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum will reflect, when completed in 2004, the heritage of coastal Carolina and maritime history represented by the shipwrecks. Located at Hatteras Village, the 19,000-square-foot climate-controlled facility is designed to withstand sustained winds of 135 mph. The museum has an amazing quantity of extraordinary relics connected to momentous events in history. Even more stunning is that many of these artifacts have landed on the Outer Banks from halfway round the world and from over 2,000 years ago.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 12, May 2004, p84-86, 88, 91-92, il Periodical Website
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6641
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First built in the Croatan Sound in 1857 and disassembled in 1955, the Roanoke Marshes Lighthouse was rebuilt on the Manteo waterfront and opened to the public in 2004. The original lighthouse was lost when the barge taking it to Edenton capsized and sank. The structure was a screwpile lighthouse, so called because of the screw at the end of each piling which allowed it to be literally screwed into the sand beneath the water. Lighthouses of this type were built over water and were designed to allow safe navigation of shipping channels in the sounds.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 12, May 2004, p66-68, 70, il Periodical Website
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6638
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Founded by John Andrew Rice and five other professors and using borrowed buildings for a campus, Black Mountain College became an innovative experiment in higher education. Established in 1933 and existing for twenty-three years, Black Mountain College was small, with an enrollment of under 100 even in the best of years. Campus life differed from that of traditional schools. Everyone, students and staff alike, worked on the college farm or in the kitchen or with construction projects.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 12, May 2004, p25-26, 29, il Periodical Website
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6642
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Tomlin discusses Wilmington's Cape Fear Serpentarium and its creator Dean Ripa. Ripa is recognized world-wide as an authority on snakes, especially the bushmaster. The Serpentarium opened in 2002. The building has two floors with 6,000 square feet containing elaborate exhibits featuring waterfalls giant rainforest trees, lush jungles, and 200 different snakes representing species from all over the world.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 12, May 2004, p72-74, 76, il Periodical Website
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6637
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Rocky Mount sits astride the line dividing Nash and Edgecombe counties and is OUR STATE magazine's Tar Heel town of the month. The town is headquarters for a number of businesses, including RBC Centura and Hardee's Food System, and boasts two community colleges, Nash and Edgecombe, and North Carolina Wesleyan College. The town has survived several natural disasters, including the great flood following Hurricane Floyd in 1999.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 12, May 2004, p18-20, 22-23, il, map Periodical Website
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6640
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Five groups of carnivorous plants are found in all regions of the state, but are most common in the Coastal Plain. In recent years the environment where these plants grow is being destroyed as wetlands are being drained for housing developments, pine plantations, and golf courses. Plant poaching is also a serious threat for some species. Adams describes each of the five groups of plants: Venus flytrap, pitcher plant, bladderwort, butterwort, and sundew.
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6639
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Reidsville artist Mel Steele is profiled in this OUR STATE magazine article. Steele built his reputation on painting realistic, rural scenes in the 1980s and 1990s. Now he is moving away from that style and is creating colorful portraits and landscapes and abstract expressionist works.
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6648
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Caviness discusses Kepley's Pit-Cooked Barbecue, which was founded by Hayden Odell Kepley. Kepley opened his restaurant on June 10, 1948, in High Point. It has remained virtually unchanged since its opening and is the city's oldest restaurant conducting business at its original location.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 12, May 2004, p172-173, il Periodical Website
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6645
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History contains many stories of pirates. Mostly, they were men who led crews in plundering ships. There were a few women, however, who chose the life of a pirate. Anne Bonny and Mary Read were two who gained infamous renown on the high seas. Smith recounts their stories.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 12, May 2004, p108-110, il Periodical Website
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6647
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For the love of llamas, birding at the beach, or dinner with the goats, three bed and breakfasts with a back-to-nature slant embrace the wilder side of life. They are WindDancers Lodge and Llama Treks (Clyde); First Colony Inn (Nags Head); The Inn at Celebrity Dairy (Siler City).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 12, May 2004, p154-156, 158, il Periodical Website
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6646
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Oesterreich discusses three Down East seafood restaurants that have been hooking coastal visitors for years. They are Sam & Omie's (Nags Head); Sanitary Fish Market (Morehead City); and River Forest Manor (Belhaven).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 12, May 2004, p130-132, 134-135, il Periodical Website
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