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10 results for Our State Vol. 68 Issue 4, Sept 2000
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Record #:
4725
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Hurricanes have struck North Carolina for centuries, destroying lives, property, and the environment. However, it is only recently that scientists seek to understand a hurricane's ecological effect. For example, Hurricane Floyd's flood washed human and natural contaminants into the Pamlico Sound; the sound's salinity also decreased 50 percent, and the chlorophyll level elevated. Scientists are studying these and other effects to learn what it means for the future of the sound and those who depend on it.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 68 Issue 4, Sept 2000, p98-102, 104-105, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4722
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Malcolm Green, general manager of Greenville Utilities, and fellow employees kept the power on in Greenville during Hurricane Floyd and the subsequent flood. Working round the clock, employees had the determination and ingenuity to hold back the waters which came within two inches of shutting off the power. Had they not succeeded, Greenville would have faced five weeks without water, power, and sewers.
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4717
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Trinity Episcopal Church in Mt. Airy enjoys a unique distinction. Built in 1896, it is the town's oldest surviving church. It is also the town's first granite-constructed building, and most importantly, the granite came from Mt. Airy, where the world's largest open-face granite quarry is located. Quarrying has been continuous since 1889, and geologists indicate the large deposit will last another 500 years.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 68 Issue 4, Sept 2000, p59-61, 63-64 Periodical Website
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Record #:
4721
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The flood fueled by Hurricane Floyd in the fall of 1999 was massive and destructive. Over 8,000 homes were destroyed, and 15,000 were left uninhabitable. Loss of livestock and crops deprived farmers of their livelihoods. While many citizens have recovered a year later, for others the recovery process is far from over. Worse still, the threat of another storm and flood remains a possibility for the future.
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4719
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Hugh Morton is a strong promoter of North Carolina. He headed the first Azalea Festival in Wilmington in 1948; fought to save the USS North Carolina and the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse; fought twelve years to keep the Blue Ridge Parkway from going over his mountain (It went around. The viaduct on Grandfather Mountain is an engineering marvel.); built the Mile-High Swinging Bridge on Grandfather Mountain; and for sixty years took photographs of the state and its people.
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Record #:
4723
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Twenty-five years ago the Historic Albemarle Tour was created. The tour covers fifteen eastern counties and twenty-seven natural and historic sites, including lighthouses and life-saving stations, the state's oldest surviving colonial architecture, museums, formal gardens, and an aquarium. Many feared for these sites when floods from Hurricane Floyd swept over the Albemarle region, but most tour sites weathered the storm.
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4718
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The North Carolina Folk Heritage Award recognizes those individuals whose work preserves the cultural traditions of families and communities. Winners for the year 2000 are Reverend F. C. Barnes, Marvin Gaster, Melvin L. Owens, Bobby McMillon, Amanda Crowe, and James Allen Rose.
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Record #:
4724
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Floods brought on by Hurricane Floyd were beyond anything people in eastern Carolina could ever imagine, and touched people from every economic level. A number of individuals share their experiences of these trying days.
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Record #:
4726
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A hurricane is a force to respect and pay attention to for residents of Ocracoke Island, which lies far from the mainland and barely above sea level. Yocum, an Ocracoke Island resident, describes the islanders' reactions to the formation of a storm, preparations for it, and the eventual arrival of the hurricane.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 68 Issue 4, Sept 2000, p107-110, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4727
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Beaufort, incorporated in 1722 in Carteret County, is the state's third-oldest town. Grizzle describes how to spend a perfect weekend there, enjoying nature, history, Harkers Island, and great seafood.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 68 Issue 4, Sept 2000, p112-116, il Periodical Website
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