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13 results for Albemarle Region--History
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Record #:
4723
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Twenty-five years ago the Historic Albemarle Tour was created. The tour covers fifteen eastern counties and twenty-seven natural and historic sites, including lighthouses and life-saving stations, the state's oldest surviving colonial architecture, museums, formal gardens, and an aquarium. Many feared for these sites when floods from Hurricane Floyd swept over the Albemarle region, but most tour sites weathered the storm.
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Record #:
16762
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Created in 1975, the Historic Albemarle Tour is the oldest organized Heritage Trail in the southeast. The tour covers 17 eastern counties and 29 natural and historic sites, including lighthouses and life-saving stations, the state's oldest surviving colonial architecture, museums, formal gardens, and an aquarium. Historic Albemarle Tour signposts along the roads guide travelers.
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Record #:
16944
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The Albemarle region has been the place of many significant historical events for America from the Lost Colony to the Wright brothers' first flight. Despite its richness in historical events, the area is sparsely populated and economically depressed. Beginning with the Great Depression and continuing through the 1950s, 60s, and 70s, much effort has been put into historic attractions and museums as a means of improving the struggling area by enlightening and attracting tourists.
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Record #:
21497
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An examination of the extent of Governor of Virginia, Sir William Berkeley's participation in the settlement of Carolina, especially the Albemarle region, due to his one-eighth share of the vast portion of real estate south of his government given to him when Charles II created him one of the \"true and Absolute Lords and Proprietaries\" of Carolina in 1662-1663.
Record #:
25056
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A group of students from UNC Chapel Hill took internships at the Albemarle Ecological Field Site in Manteo. Students learned a lot about various fields and got hands-on participation that helped them better understand what they were learning.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2003, p21-22, por Periodical Website
Record #:
22120
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Contrary to popular accounts of North Carolina history, the first settlers on the north side of the Albemarle Sound did not come to the area to escape religious persecution in Virginia and New England. The author addresses the specific historiography on the subject using accounts from contemporary witnesses to support his analysis.
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Record #:
22710
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Housed in the English National Archives is a letter from Robert Holden, former resident of Virginia and the Albemarle, to Sir George Carteret, chairman of the proprietary board. The letter--from 1679--describes, for the first time, the Albemarle region in detail, including climate, native populations, fauna, and political government.
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Record #:
22717
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In desperate need of people, English North American colonies transported men and women to help settle the continent through bound labor, or indentured servitude. Far more numerous than slaves before 1700, nearly half of the immigrants to America until the American Revolution were indentured servants. Indentured servitude did not occupy the same position in the Albemarle Region of North Carolina as it did in Virginia given the geographic isolation and the enslavement of Native American populations.
Record #:
32969
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All the land of the Carolinas from the Atlantic to the Pacific was granted to Eight English noblemen, whose names are still reflected in current place names. When the land didn’t produce as much profit as desired, all but one, John, Lord Carteret, returned their land interest to the crown for 2,500 pounds. John was later appointed Earl of Granville; and both names are still present in the form of counties.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 52, May 1945, p17
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Record #:
33663
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A gnarled old tree in Charles O. Robinson’s yard in Elizabeth City, is responsible for the many thousands of other pecan trees that now abound in the Albemarle section. The area’s leading textile manufacturer and banker got his start when he planted groves of pecan trees by transplanting the nuts from the pecan tree in his father’s yard when he was a teenager.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 6 Issue 27, Dec 1938, p7, il
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Record #:
34553
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George Durant was a Virginia resident who, in 1659, joined a group of settlers traveling south to purchase land in near the Perquimans River in modern day North Carolina. The Durant family settled on a tract aptly named Durant’s Land and established a tobacco plantation. Rising taxes on New England tobacco imports created tension among planters and Durant threatened to revolt against the Governor in charge of the Albemarle region. Durant became one of the leaders in Culpepper’s Rebellion and was a key participant in re-establishing the colonial government.
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Record #:
37229
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This article gives rambling thoughts on shipping trade, court punishment, slavery, and town of Plymouth and a water spout in the Albemarle Sound.
Record #:
37244
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Small historical overview of the Albemarle Sound.