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6 results for Our State Vol. 67 Issue 7, Dec 1999
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4373
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Running the Union blockade of Wilmington during the Civil War was a risk. On September 26, 1864, Marie DeRosset and daughter Gabrielle set sail aboard the Lynx, seeking to reach Marie's malaria-stricken husband in Nassau. Union ships attacked the LYNX, severely damaging the vessel. Mother and daughter barely escaped. Gabrielle DeRosset lived the rest of her life in Wilmington, becoming known as a musician and historian. She died in 1936.
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4371
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With four acres under roof, Asheville's Biltmore Estate is the country's largest private home. When Christmas at Biltmore began in 1976, $50,000 was spent on decorating, and a few thousand visitors came. Today over $1 million is spent on decorations, and over 200,000 come to look at them between November 6 and January 2. Among the decorations are 38 Christmas trees, some 40 feet high; 300 wreaths; and 4 miles of garland.
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4370
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Conceived by North Carolina State University basketball coach C. Everett Case, the Dixie Classic was a three-day, eight-team basketball tournament extravaganza, featuring North Carolina teams against other national basketball powers. Begun in the then new Reynolds Coliseum in Raleigh in December 1949, the tournament lasted another twelve years and was a tremendous success. The Dixie Classic was canceled in 1960, after several players were involved in a point shaving scandal.
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4374
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In the winter of 1753, the Moravian church in Pennsylvania sent twelve young men to the Piedmont section of North Carolina to start a settlement which they called Bethabara. This village gave way in the 1760s to the newer town of Salem. Several of Bethabara's original buildings and stone foundations remain. Today the state's first Moravian settlement is a historic site and city park.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 67 Issue 7, Dec 1999, p114-116, 118-119 Periodical Website
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Record #:
4376
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On January 6, 1766, twelve men set forth from the villages of Bethania and Bethabara in the North Carolina Piedmont and walked ten miles to begin construction of a new settlement called Salem. The new town was founded to serve as the church's administrative and commercial center. Today Old Salem is a National Historic District and stands as one of the best colonial restoration projects in the nation.
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4375
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In Raleigh on the corner of McDowell and Hillsborough streets stands Sacred Heart Cathedral, the smallest Catholic cathedral in the nation. When the current building was completed in 1924, the Throne of the Bishop for the Catholic Diocese of North Carolina was housed at Sacred Heart. Since the seat of the Bishop was there at the time, the church was deemed a cathedral.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 67 Issue 7, Dec 1999, p111-112, il Periodical Website
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