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8 results for North Carolina Vol. 60 Issue 9, Sept 2002
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Record #:
5390
Abstract:
In the fall of 2004, Johnson & Wales University, the nation's premier hospitality and career college, will open a campus in uptown Charlotte. This is a big economic success for the city. The university will bring 3,000 students and employees into the central business district. J & W will spend $82 million to build the university. At full enrollment in 2007, it will have a $60 million impact on the city.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 60 Issue 9, Sept 2002, p6, il
Record #:
5391
Author(s):
Abstract:
Brafford describes five new golf courses that have opened in the state since Labor Day 2001: Farmstead Golf Links (Calabash); The Heritage Club (Wake Forest); The Links at Cotton Valley (Tarboro); Old Chatham Golf Course (Durham); and The Preserve at Jordan Lake.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 60 Issue 9, Sept 2002, p14, 16-21, il
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Record #:
5404
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dr. Robert Knott became Catawba College's 19th president on June 1, 2002. Enrollment at the school is approximately 1,600, and includes students from 20 foreign countries. Knott is a graduate of Wake Forest University, and his college career positions include provost at Catawba, 1982-1989; president Tusculum (Ala.) College, 1989-1999; and chancellor of Mars Hill (Tenn.) College since 1999.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 60 Issue 9, Sept 2002, p50, il
Record #:
5405
Author(s):
Abstract:
Carolina is experiencing a teacher shortage. One estimate is that the state will need to hire 12,000 teachers a year over the next decade. One approach to dealing with the shortage is NC TEACH, a statewide licensure program designed to recruit, prepare, and support mid-career professionals for a teaching career in the state. Mebane discusses the program and why professionals like chemists, accountants, and lawyers are attracted to it.
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Record #:
5499
Author(s):
Abstract:
This special NORTH CAROLINA magazine community profile supplement discusses Rowan County, an area accustomed to a strong economy. The county lies halfway between Charlotte and the Triad and is divided by I-85. In addition to its business world success, Rowan County boasts a number of tourist attractions, including the North Carolina Transportation Museum and Lazy 5 Ranch, each attracting 100,000 yearly, and Dan Nichols Park, which draws 800,000.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 60 Issue 9, Sept 2002, p31-32, 35-36, 38, 42, 44, 46, 48-49, 51-52, 54, 58, il
Record #:
5500
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cheerwine, a burgundy-colored cola with a hint of lemon-lime, was first bottled in Salisbury, in Rowan County, in 1917. Cheerwine still remains a family-owned business. The company has begun marketing outside the state and also has developed a respectable mail-order business for North Carolinians who have moved away.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 60 Issue 9, Sept 2002, p34, il
Record #:
5501
Author(s):
Abstract:
At age 75, Rose Post has been a reporter on the Salisbury Post for over 51 years. She was a recipient of the national Ernie Pyle Award in 1989, and has won more awards than anyone else in the history of the North Carolina Press Association.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 60 Issue 9, Sept 2002, p40, il
Record #:
5498
Author(s):
Abstract:
James Causby is one of North Carolina's outstanding school system superintendents and was named North Carolina Superintendent of the Year in 1991, 1998, and 2001. EXECUTIVE EDUCATION magazine has also named him one of the 100 outstanding superintendents in the United States. Causby is featured in NORTH CAROLINA magazine's \"executive profile.\"
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 60 Issue 9, Sept 2002, p22, 24-27, il