NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


3 results for Black River--Description and travel
Currently viewing results 1 - 3
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
5501
Author(s):
Abstract:
At age 75, Rose Post has been a reporter on the Salisbury Post for over 51 years. She was a recipient of the national Ernie Pyle Award in 1989, and has won more awards than anyone else in the history of the North Carolina Press Association.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 60 Issue 9, Sept 2002, p40, il
Record #:
9041
Author(s):
Abstract:
Near Ingold in Sampson County, the Coharie and Six Runs Creeks join to form the Black River, which flows 66 miles before emptying into the Cape Fear River 14 miles above Wilmington. The Black River was a commercial highway from the colonial period until the late 19-century. Peterson describes a journey down the river in which he discovers its history and explores its natural surroundings.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
8732
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Black River begins in Sampson County and flows sixty-six miles before emptying into the Cape Fear River fourteen miles above Wilmington. The water is black because unlike the Neuse and Cape Fear rivers, the Black River does not have sediment deposits, and its water is more acidic. Earley traveled two months on the river discovering its history and exploring the natural surroundings. Once a commercial thoroughfare, the river has again returned to its ancient ways. The steamboats and naval stores industry are gone. Some of the towns have fallen into ruin. No industries pollute it; no dams interrupt it; and no reservoirs disturb its flooding patterns.
Source:
Full Text: