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10 results for North Carolina Literary Review Vol. Issue 12, 2003
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Record #:
6244
Abstract:
Robinson continues this series which profiles North Carolina writers, as well as those who have written in and about the state. Included in this latest installment are O. Henry (William Sidney Porter), Guy Owen, Jr., Gwendolyn M. Parker, and Donald Parson.
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Record #:
6807
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Windmill Point Restaurant is located at Mile Post 16 and one-half on the by-pass in Nags Head. The restaurant is owned by Sarah E. Forbes, MD, of Newport News, Virginia. It is a combination of first-class dining and the nation's largest private collection of memorabilia, assembled by Forbes, from the famous luxury liner, S.S. United States. Robinson describes the food served and ship's items that surround patrons as they dine.
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Record #:
6809
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The Lafayette Escadrille was founded by a group of American pilots who volunteered to fly for the French Air Service at the beginning of the First World War. Two of the nine founding members were from North Carolina: James Rogers McConnell, from Carthage, and Kiffin Yates Rockwell, from Asheville. Both were killed during the conflict.
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Record #:
6808
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Writing of eastern North Carolina fish stews, Sparrow comments, “like their cousin pig pickin's, they are highly ritualized and symbolic social events.” He describes the ingredients, the preparation, the serving of the stew, the accompanying components of the meal, and where folks gather to eat it.
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Record #:
19764
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North Carolina author Clyde Edgerton created his own fictional universe in Hansen County, North Carolina. Based upon the small town he grew up in and including many of the characters and locales of his childhood, Edgerton's literary cosmos also includes his celebration of the ties that bind individuals, their families, and their shared histories together.                             
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Record #:
19767
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The Windmill Point Restaurant and S.S. United States Lounge at Nag's Head brings a distinctive atmosphere and experience to the Outer Banks. A first-class dining establishment, the Windmill Point Restaurant also contains the S.S. United States Lounge, which features one of the largest private collections of memorabilia from a steamer. The dining experience combines a first-class dining experience with an informational session about an important aspect of our national maritime history.
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Record #:
19762
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Manteo resident Marguerite Lyle Drinkwater Booth vividly recalls the stories her father would tell her about the early glory days of aviation that took place on the Outer Banks. Her father, Alpheus W. Drinkwater, was a salvage officer, local telegraph operator, and avid aviation enthusiast. As a telegraph operator, Drinkwater relayed the first message of the Wright Brothers' first successful flight and sent many communications instrumental in the US governments's acquisition of aircraft for military purposes.
Record #:
19766
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The Hillbilly Hideaway, of Stokes County, is a restaurant aptly named to reflect the local nature that permeates throughout the establishment. The restaurant is not advertised in billboards or in newspapers, but almost one thousand people visit it every weekend. Promoted through local word of mouth, the Hillbilly Hideaway features live music, a Southern design aesthetic, and a generous spread of country cooking that one will not find anywhere else.
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Record #:
19763
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Through this interview with North Carolina author Clyde Edgerton, the interviewer gets a picture of the events of Edgerton's life that progressed from his childhood dream of becoming an Air Force pilot to his realization he wanted to become a writer of literature. Edgerton's frankness and colorful stories help to bring out the fullness of his life.
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Record #:
19768
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The fish stews created in eastern North Carolina are more than just an ordinary folk meal. Similar in meaning to a pig picking, fish stews are highly ritualized and symbolic social events. A festive but informal meal, fish stews are often prepared for large crowds who gather to enjoy one another's company while the meal cooks. The unpretentiousness of the meal reflects favorably to a people who value reality over appearances.
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North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. Issue 12, 2003, p130-132, il, por Periodical Website
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