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3 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 61 Issue 1, Jan 1984
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Record #:
21433
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In 1755, Moravian Church leader Nicolaus Ludwig von Zinzendorf designed a town to be built in Forsyth County, North Carolina. The town was based on von Zinzendorf's belief that the new city be inward looking, a religious refuge, church and community centered, healthful and open to outside trade and communication. His plan for the town of Unitas, now Salem, was founded on the ideas of Roman architect Pollio Vitruvius and found little acceptance at the New Moravian headquarters in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. After von Zinzendorf's passing in 1760, the Moravian leader in America, August Spangenberg developed a new grid plan to better fit the current Moravian needs and philosophy.
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Record #:
21431
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The Gold Hill mining district of south-central North Carolina was an important gold producing area during 1842-1853. By the early 1850s Gold Hill established itself as a rewarding mining region but its development was hindered by a lack of specialized knowledge in deep mining methods, the reluctance of residents to turn over agricultural lands to gold prospectors, shortage of skilled miners, lack of investment capital, and an excess of competition between mining companies.
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Record #:
21435
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Abstract:
During the Civil War in Randolph County and adjacent areas, conflict between pro-Union residents and Confederate supporters occurred on a regular basis. The Randolph County area was populated by pacifists, abolitionists, Quakers, Wesleyans, Moravians, and Dunkards. The anti-Confederate sentiment appealed to army deserters and lower-class residents who were unaffected by the Confederacy's pro-planter and upper class policies. Local leaders John Hilton, Bryan Tyson, and William Owens utilized public appeals and guerrilla warfare to gain supporters and disrupt local affairs. The conflict between the two sides did not end with the Civil War but continued into the Reconstruction era.
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