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7 results for North Carolina Folklore Journal Vol. 43 Issue 2, Summer/Fall 1996
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Record #:
3177
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Harkers Island work boat, twenty-two feet of low-cost materials, usually powered by a car motor, is a dependable craft able to handle the demands of man and nature. It is also representative of the culture that produced it.
Record #:
3178
Author(s):
Abstract:
Charlie Boyd Craven's family was one of the oldest of the Seagrove pottery clans, and he was its last active member. His years of work, 1919-1942 and 1971-1991, were separated, yet when he began again, his pottery still reflected the traditional ways.
Source:
Record #:
36037
Author(s):
Abstract:
Stepping is an African American dance and performance tradition unique to African American Greek communities. Dating back to the 1930s, it developed from pledges marching in line as part of their initiation into the Greek organizations. Creating step routines parallels the important African American feature of songs, which is lyric sampling. Like lyric sampling, new stepping pieces are created by borrowing pieces of other routines and making improvisations.
Record #:
36038
Author(s):
Abstract:
Explanations for stepping from students often connect the tradition to African dance forms, and they reflect an Afrocentric perspective that combines a deep pride in African roots with a desire to recognize elements of American culture as African-based.
Record #:
36035
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Theta Pi chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority at UNC Chapel Hill, along with other African American organizations, uses stepping as a creative vehicle that helped to define group image through words and movement.
Record #:
36040
Author(s):
Abstract:
After three bags containing items of Afro-Cuban religious and cult origins washed up on a beach, the author was contacted to decipher the meanings. Most objects were associated with Santeria, and some from Palo Mayombe. They are both religious cults which began in the Caribbean as a result of blending different aspects from two or more religious systems over a period of time. Santeria is a combination of Yoruba, a Nigerian tribe, and Cuban Catholicism. Palo Mayombe came from Bantu peoples and Catholicism, but focuses on performing magic hoping to cause misfortune or death to their enemies.
Record #:
36042
Abstract:
Lincoln Academy, located in Gastonia, NC, was one of the first accredited African American high schools. The school closed in the 1950s and fell into disrepair and became a hub for teenagers. When the body of a teenage girl was found there, rumors and legends started up associated with the murder.