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10 results for Friend of Wildlife Vol. 31 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1984
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Record #:
26742
Author(s):
Abstract:
The youth participated in the second Fur, Fish and Game Rendezvous held at Camp Millstone near Ellerbe, North Carolina. The camp focuses on environmental education, outdoor recreation, and ethics. The campers spent five days participating in fourteen different classes and demonstrations presented by the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 31 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1984, p4, il, por
Record #:
26741
Author(s):
Abstract:
Finding the perfect boat is a challenge for North Carolina hunters because of the variety of conditions under which they pursue their game. Friends of Wildlife recommend three different types of duck boats, each of which is adapted to a particular kind of hunting. They include a 14’ aluminum canoe, a 12’ fiberglass sneak boat, and a 16’ jon boat.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 31 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1984, p3-7, il, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
26743
Author(s):
Abstract:
A bill approved by Congress in June adds over eighty-million dollars to the federal Dingell-Johnson Fund, used to develop state sport fishery and recreational boating programs. Now, motors and equipment such as tackle boxes, lines and hooks will be taxed.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 31 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1984, p5, il
Record #:
26744
Author(s):
Abstract:
There was a two-percent increase in waterfowl harvests this year. Wood ducks comprised the majority of hunting harvests, followed by mallards and snow geese.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 31 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1984, p6
Subject(s):
Record #:
26747
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Cape Hatteras Lighthouse on North Carolina’s Outer Banks will be closed to visitors while experts try to determine causes of cracks in its walls and deterioration of its cast iron parts. The National Park Service will call on a private engineering firm for a detailed inspection and advice on how to correct the problem.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 31 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1984, p7, il
Record #:
26748
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Game Lands Use Permit entitles a holder to hunt, trap, fish, train dogs, or participate in field trials on any of the game lands designated in North Carolina. The Sandhills Game Land is a popular location for deer and dove hunting, and offers an early season for bow hunters.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 31 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1984, p9-10, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
26750
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Carrasan Power Company has proposed to dam the river above Drift Falls in Transylvania County, North Carolina and divert most of its flow through a pipeline. The proposal threatens a section of Horsepasture River, which is among the most scenic and accessible river in the state for fishing.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 31 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1984, p15, por
Record #:
26749
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Nongame and Endangered Wildlife Fund raised enough money from tax contributions to fund the peregrine falcon restoration project. Two existing programs for bald eagles and sea turtles are also being continued using funds from the tax checkoff.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 31 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1984, p14
Subject(s):
Record #:
26746
Author(s):
Abstract:
Biologists with the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission are studying the possible expansion of the range of wild boar in North Carolina. They are evaluating factors to be considered if wild boar are to be stocked on previously uninhabited land.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 31 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1984, p6
Subject(s):
Record #:
26745
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina landowners can donate land for conservation purposes and receive income tax credit. The land must be certified by the North Carolina Department of Natural Resources and Community Development.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 31 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1984, p6
Subject(s):