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899 results for Coastwatch
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Record #:
42674
Abstract:
The authors consider possible factors indicating a warming trend in North Carolina. The past 30 years have seen some of the warmest years on record.
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Record #:
42677
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Riley Mulhern has developed a model for calculating the characteristics for locations with a greater chance of lead contaminants in drinking water. Mulhern;'s team has found a marked association between high levels of lead in children and low income and African American neighborhoods in Wake County.
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Record #:
42684
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A large scale study initiated through the North Carolina Sea Grant, NCDOT and other state and local government entities has determined that thoughtful planning and targeted route improvements or "resilient routes" for highways are key to dealing with eastern north Carolina's flooding issues after significant storms.
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Record #:
42675
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Students at Cape Hatteras Secondary School of Coastal Studies conducted a study called "Student Perspectives on Coastal Change". A survey taken noted students believe climate change has affected increased storm activity among a number of questions asked.
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Record #:
42676
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The authors discuss techniques for finfish, shellfish, shrimp, picked crabmeat and offer new recipes.
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Record #:
39970
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Like "farm to table," "sea to table" encourages restaurants and their distributors to obtain food from local producers and harvesters. Slowing this trend's momentum are impediments such as harvest regulations and an underdeveloped supply chain. The author's evidence that overcoming such barriers is worthwhile includes national market research. It asserts that people, when offered the option, would rather have locally grown or harvested foods.
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Record #:
39971
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Proving the necessity of dunes is illustrations of the lingering impact of hurricanes on them and coastal ecosystems. Also used as evidence is the process involved with their return. The complexity of dune formation is explained in descriptions and images, which include species vulnerable and resistant to hurricane-generated erosion’s impact.
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Record #:
39976
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Lowery’s book examines the complex relationship between Native American tribes and whites in Eastern North Carolina, true since their initial contact in Roanoke. Justice denied George Lowry for the murders of his sons displays the tension. Lumbees in present day Robeson County with English surnames and John Lawson’s observation of Hatteras Indians with gray eyes alludes peaceful relations between the races.
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Record #:
39992
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This was a transcript of an interview with Malinda Lowery, in which she discussed her book, The Lumbee Indians: An American Struggle. Her responses focused on Lumbee history lessons that can offer better solutions for particular social and environmental issues. George Lowry’s pursuit of recompense for his sons’ murders can inspire those experiencing racial injustice. A perspective stressing deeper kinship with the natural world can model effective ways to cope with natural disasters like hurricanes.
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Record #:
39998
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A partnership of community members, businesses, higher educational institutions, nonprofits, and government agencies is generating solutions for coastal problems yielded by last year’s hurricanes. Goals of the Collaborative Research Grant Program include improving constructed wetland efficiency and hurricane recovery for small towns in counties such as Carteret.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Fall 2019, p26-31 Periodical Website
Record #:
39996
Abstract:
This chronicle of the hurricane that left “the flood of the century” in its wake left behind a deluge of memories. Accompanying figures such as 52 deaths and over 500 million dollars in lost crops were interviews of people from Northeast, Grifton, Tick Bite, Wallace, and New Bern.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Fall 2019, p13-19 Periodical Website
Record #:
39997
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The Old-Growth Forest in Three Sisters Swamp lives up to its name, through trees such as a Bald Cypress named Methuselah and two others possibly two millennia old. It is from these trees, among the oldest in the United States, that researchers are hoping to find the secret to conserving trees in the Black River area.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Fall 2019, p20-25 Periodical Website
Record #:
39995
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The term shop local, usually associated with farmers’ markets, may now be applied to the growing numbers of people preferring locally harvested seafood. The sea to table movement is part of a growing trend of consuming products considered fresher, more natural, and aiding in the prevention of chronic health condition.
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Record #:
39994
Abstract:
The author asserts that, rather than causing hurricane-related damage, trees can help prevent it, with Southern Red Oak and Live Oak as the best buffers against the wind. Not throwing caution to the wind, advice wise, Braswell suggests sacrificing old, mature trees with structural damage.
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Record #:
40007
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Abstract:
Helping individuals improve garden quality at all stages is Coastal Landscapes Initiative. Encouraging nature-friendly landscaping practices, CLI’s booklet includes information about native plants adaptable and appealing. The thirty-four species included Eastern Red Cedar, Coral Honeysuckle, and Spotted Horsemint.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Fall 2019, p32-37 Periodical Website