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6 results for Coastwatch Vol. Issue , High Season 2000
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4730
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Ecotourism is increasing along North Carolina's coast, with high interest in birding and marine mammal observation. In 1999, the North Carolina Sea Grant staff conducted a survey to learn tourists' environmental interests and the impact of commercial dolphin-watch enterprises on the Outer Banks. Among the findings were that over 50 percent of tourists wanted to known more about the marine environment, but 80 percent knew little or nothing about the Marine Mammal Protection Act passed in 1972. The survey focused on tourists who came to the Outer Banks to see bottlenose dolphins.
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Record #:
4731
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Through his CBS television program \"Sunday Morning,\" Charles Kuralt brought the beauty of the nation's National Wildlife Refuges to millions of viewers. To honor his efforts, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service created the Charles Kuralt Trail, which links eleven national wildlife refuges and one national fish hatchery. The trail winds though the coastal plain of Virginia and North Carolina, and includes the Great Dismal Swamp and Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge.
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4732
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The red drum, also called channel bass, puppy drum, or redfish, was named North Carolina's saltwater fish in 1971. Currently red drum numbers are dwindling, and anglers are limited to one 18- to 27- inch red drum a day. However, any number may be caught under the state's catch-and-release program. Sea Grant recreational fishing extension specialist Jim Bahem discusses fishing for red drum using this technique.
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4729
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Next to Washington state, North Carolina has the nation's second-largest ferry system, with twenty-four ferries operating year-round. Besides transporting two million passengers yearly, the ferry system is a lifeline for many communities. In emergencies, ferries assist in hurricane evacuation and also aid in water rescues. Soon selected ferries will become science labs, carrying automated devices to monitor such data as salinity, temperature, oxygen levels, and nutrients in coastal waters.
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Record #:
4728
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The United States Coast Guard Station on Ocracoke Island closed in 1996 after nearly six decades of service. Now, through a $400,000 appropriation from the North Carolina General Assembly, the 10,000-square-foot building will be renovated for use as a professional development center for North Carolina teachers. The North Carolina Center for the Advancement of Teachers (NCCAT) at Cullowhee and the East Carolina University maritime studies program will manage the building.
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Record #:
4737
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Recently, historian David Cecelski discovered the only known copy of Allen Parker's Recollections of Slavery Times in the Illinois State Historical Library at Springfield. Parker, a slave in eastern Carolina, told his story in 1895, while living in Worcester, Massachusetts. Cecelski uses Parker's text to describe how slaves lived their daily lives.
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