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4 results for Carolina Country Vol. 39 Issue 2, Feb 2007
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Record #:
8521
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Abstract:
After the Revolutionary War, farmers in western North Carolina and Virginia could not compete with the farmers in the eastern parts of the two states because of the cost of shipping goods overland. Rivers soon proved an alternative to roads, however. The Roanoke River was selected because it rises in western Virginia and flows 400 miles to the Albemarle Sound. Many improvements were needed to make the river navigable. The biggest project was a canal that started at Weldon and ran about nine miles upriver to bypass the rapids at present-day Roanoke Rapids. Today the canal has been turned into a park and walking trail. The middle canal locks in Roanoke Rapids have been renovated and turned into a museum.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 39 Issue 2, Feb 2007, p22-23, il
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Record #:
8520
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Abstract:
In 1933, the nation was in the midst of the Great Depression. One of President Franklin Roosevelt's plans to get people back to work was the National Industry Recovery Act of 1933. The act established the Subsistence Homesteads Division in the Interior Department. The purpose was to create towns that would help farmers and industrial workers by moving families to homestead farming communities and planned mill towns. Penderlea, in Pender County, was the first homestead farm project in the nation. Gannon describes the building of Penderlea, what life was like there, and what the town is like in 2007.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 39 Issue 2, Feb 2007, p14-15, il
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Record #:
8519
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North Carolina's Highway Historical Marker Program, which celebrated its seventieth anniversary in 2006, is one of the oldest and most respected of its kind in the country. There are markers in all one hundred counties, over 1,440 currently. Gery describes twenty-eight markers that highlight the important role rural people and places have had in the state's history.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 39 Issue 2, Feb 2007, p11-13, il, map
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Record #:
8522
Author(s):
Abstract:
Georgia Thompson Brown of Granville County was a pioneer of aviation. Better known as Tiny Broadwick, she made her mark not by flying airplanes, but by parachuting from them. Broadwick saw her first parachute jumper at a circus, and from that moment, she wanted to do nothing else in life but be a jumper. Her first jump was from a hot air balloon in 1908 at the North Carolina State Fair. In 1913, she became the first woman to parachute from a plane and the first to jump from a hydroplane. Between 1908 and 1922, she made over 1,000 jumps. She received the John Glenn Medal in 1964, and in 1976, she was inducted into the OX5 Hall of Fame, along with the Wright Brothers and Charles Lindbergh.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 39 Issue 2, Feb 2007, p26-27, il
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