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3 results for Carolina Country Vol. 36 Issue 7, July 2004
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Record #:
7039
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Abstract:
Williams describes an incident of World War II having a North Carolina connection. On May 11, 1942, off the North Carolina coast, the German submarine U-558 sank HMS Bedfordshire, a British naval ship on submarine patrol. All thirty-seven British sailors were killed. Days later four bodies from the ship washed up on Ocracoke Island. Residents buried the four in a small plot. Later the United States ceded the land to England in perpetuity for one dollar. Each May memorial services are held there by military representatives from Canada, England, and the United States.
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Record #:
7040
Author(s):
Abstract:
Burgess discusses kenaf, a plant with amazing market potential and versatility that may one day outpace tobacco and cotton in the state's agricultural economy. Farmers in eastern North Carolina hope to become the world's largest single source of processed kenaf. The plant, which is cultivated worldwide, can stand twelve feet high and is very dense. Currently, a group of farmers in Greene, Pitt, and few other counties is growing kenaf. The group, known as Greene Natural Fibers, grows the crop, processes it, and develops markets for their products.
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Record #:
7038
Author(s):
Abstract:
Because 2003 session of the North Carolina House of Representatives was almost evenly divided between Republicans and Democrats, Republican Richard T. Morgan of Moore County and Democrat James B. Black of Mecklenburg County agreed to share the speakership. In this CAROLINA COUNTRY interview, Black and Morgan discuss how the experiment worked.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 36 Issue 7, July 2004, p10-11, por Periodical Website