NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


8 results for Business North Carolina Vol. 20 Issue 2, Feb 2000
Currently viewing results 1 - 8
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
4444
Author(s):
Abstract:
Falling commodity prices, drought, hurricanes, floods, and criticism of tobacco nationwide made 1999 a tough year for farmers. Only one-fourth of the state's farmland escaped Hurricane Floyd's flooding. The cotton crop sustained a $140 million loss, and half the sweet potato crop was lost. Worse yet, the state estimates that 10 to 15 percent of the 55,000 farmers will quit in 2000.
Record #:
4445
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1999, construction companies did not lack for projects statewide. However, the state's low unemployment level (3.2 percent in October 1999) caused many companies to have project backlogs because there were not enough workers. This worker shortage lengthened many job completions by 10 to 20 percent. Many companies are offering incentives to hourly workers, like health insurance and 401(k)s.
Record #:
4442
Abstract:
Computer technology creates businesses across the state and also provides solutions to keeping older companies in business. Gray examines a start-up software company in Durham, WebWide Information Systems, Inc., and looks at two older companies, Royal Park Uniforms, Inc. in Prospect Hill and Century Valdese, Inc. in Hickory, to see how new technology helped the companies stay competitive.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 20 Issue 2, Feb 2000, p24-25, 27-30, 33-47, il Periodical Website
Record #:
4443
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although high-tech companies make up only 10 percent of the list of the state's one hundred largest employers, the technology itself affects the remaining companies in a number of ways, including improving security, efficiency, recordkeeping, and cost reduction. Waller lists the top one hundred employers. Delhaize America, Inc. is the largest employer with 35,355 workers.
Source:
Record #:
4446
Author(s):
Abstract:
Employment is high in North Carolina; consumer prices are low; and retail sales are up. For the fiscal year ending June 1999, retail sales were up $126.3 billion or 8 percent from 1998. Retail areas posting gains included department stores, up 13.4 percent to $2.3 billion; discount stores, up 7.4 percent to $7.1 billion; and auto sales, up 13.4 percent to $7.8 billion.
Subject(s):
Record #:
4441
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state's one hundred counties are divided into seven economic regions for the purpose of promoting each region to attract prospective employers. Counties within each region are profiled in terms of population, per-capita income, employment, and retail sales.
Source:
Record #:
4440
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state's one hundred counties are profiled in terms of population, civilian labor force, building permits, per capita income, and population on food stamps.
Source:
Record #:
4447
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hurricanes Dennis and Floyd; a hot, dry summer; and a flood influenced tourists' decisions on whether or not to vacation in North Carolina. A number of tourists wrote off the entire state, even though only certain sections were affected. Tourism dropped slightly, despite a public relations campaign by the North Carolina Department of Tourism. On the positive side, big events like the Special Olympics World Games in Raleigh and the U.S. Open in Pinehurst were boons to tourism.
Source:
Subject(s):