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177 results for "Sea Chest"
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Record #:
7583
Abstract:
Baxter Miller entered the Life Saving Service in 1890 at the age of seventeen and retired after thirty years service in 1921. During his career he assisted in saving over 300 lives and was awarded two Congressional Medals of Honor for Lifesaving, the Gold Medal and a Silver Medal from the United States government, and a silver watch from the German government for helping in the rescue of their men from the BREWSTER.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Winter 1977, p40-44, il, por
Record #:
7578
Author(s):
Abstract:
Before the lifesaving stations were manned fulltime in 1905, they operated on an active season and inactive season. Active meant fulltime operation between September 1 and May 1, and inactive meant the summer months when only the keeper was on duty. This article describes station activities for every day of the week; a beach apparatus drill by the keeper and seven surfmen; beach patrols and tower watches; equipment used for rescues; and surfboats.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Winter 1977, p15-19, 22-23, 26-27, il
Record #:
7580
Author(s):
Abstract:
Charles T. Williams II was born on Hatteras Island in 1892. When he was 83, he wrote a book about the village of Avon, titled The Kinnakeeter. Williams was never in the lifesaving service, but he hung around the stations as much as he could when he was young. He recounts how the beach patrols and watches worked, riding on beach patrol with his uncle Benjamin Scarborough, and activities about the stations around the turn of the century.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Winter 1977, p24-25
Record #:
7579
Abstract:
Ulysses S. “Lish” Midgett was born in Chicamacomico on Hatteras Island. At the age of 91, he is one of the last remaining surfmen of the original United States Lifesaving Service. In this SEA CHEST interview, Midgett recounts his years of service.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Winter 1977, p20-21, por
Record #:
7576
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article is a compilation of the keepers and crews who manned the eleven life-saving stations on Hatteras Island between 1874 and 1914. The stations are Oregon Inlet, Pea Island, New Inlet, Chicamacomico, Gull Shore, Little Kinnakeet, Big Kinnakeet, Cape Hatteras, Creeds Hill, and Durants.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Winter 1977, p49-62, il, bibl
Record #:
7581
Author(s):
Abstract:
Couch recounts the story of a heroic rescue of the barkentine EPHRAIM WILLIAMS in the rough seas off Cape Hatteras 1889. Station keepers Benjamin B. Dailey, Patrick H. Etheridge, and several surfmen received the Gold Lifesaving Medal for this rescue.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Winter 1977, p30-35, il
Record #:
7577
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hatteras Island lifesaving stations were two-story buildings. This article discusses how the rooms were used for crew and equipment storage and how the buildings were constructed. Included is a complete set of architectural plans for these buildings.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Winter 1977, p7-14, il
Record #:
7585
Abstract:
The children of Urias Gaskins, Isaac Jennette, and Edward Midgett discuss the lives of their parents. Gaskins was the officer in charge of the Cape Hatteras Coast Guard Station at the time of his death. He received the Silver Medal of Honor for assisting in the rescue of the crew of the BREWSTER. Jennette spent his life in the Coast Guard and died while on duty. He also received the Silver Medal of Honor for assisting in the rescue of the crew of the BREWSTER. Midgett served twenty-eight years in the Life Saving Service and died at the age of eighty-three. He was a recipient of the Silver Medal of Honor for the BREWSTER incident.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Winter 1977, p46-48, por
Record #:
7584
Abstract:
The German ship Brewster was one of the largest ships to go aground on Diamond Shoals. When the ship, carrying a crew of thirty-three, grounded on November 29, 1909, three lifesaving crews responded. It was impossible for the rescuers to board, because seas were breaking over the ship, yet they managed to rescue the entire crew. Eleven medals of honor were awarded to the rescuers in the incident.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Winter 1977, p45
Record #:
7820
Abstract:
The Honduran freighter, OMAR BABUN, came ashore on the Outer Banks on May 14, 1954, about three miles north of the Chicamacomico Coast Guard Station in Rodanthe. In this SEA CHEST interview, Ed McLeod recounts the story of the last breeches buoy rescue on Hatteras Island, how the ship was unloaded, and what finally happened to the vessel.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p12-14, il
Record #:
7819
Author(s):
Abstract:
The MONITOR, a Union ironclad, went to the bottom in a storm off Cape Hatteras on December 31, 1862. The resting place of ship was not discovered until 1973. In 1975, the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration declared the site the first marine sanctuary. State underwater archaeologist, Gordon Watts discusses how the wreck was discovered and the possibility of raising the ship.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p6-11, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
29896
Abstract:
A dream of the Dare County, North Carolina people for over 40 years, the Wanchese Seafood Industrial Park is the largest commercial enterprise in county. Located on Roanoke Island, the site is 45 acres and financed with county, state, and federal funds. The park will provide up to 400 jobs and North Carolina legislation is creating a NC Seafood Industrial Park Authority for maintaining and operating this park and others the might be developed in the state.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 3, Fall 1979, p18-21, por, map
Record #:
29901
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cisterns have been used on Hatteras Island, North Carolina for decades, and some of them are still being used. These large containers are used to collect and store rainwater in case issues arise with water plant supplies in the future.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 3, Fall 1979, p38-39, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
29923
Author(s):
Abstract:
Along the North Carolina and Virginia coasts, hundreds of shipwrecks lie on the beaches and underwater. Although some will never be uncovered, others are popular tourist and dive destinations like the DIAMOND SHOALS LIGHTSHIP and the USS MONITOR.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1980, p8-9, il, por
Record #:
29861
Author(s):
Abstract:
Maurice L. Burrus, born in Hatters is 1898, first played baseball while attending Elizabeth City High School. He later moved on to Oak Ridge Preparatory, Furman University, and then North Carolina State, where he played baseball while working on textile engineering. In 1919, when Burrus left college he built up a reputation as a professional batter and was later brought up to the National League Club in Philadelphia. With improved fielding, Burrus was the Boston Brave's regular first baseman by 1925. Although he only played 10 years of professional baseball, Burrus was Dare County's first major league baseball player.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 3, July 1976, p17-19, por