NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


422 results for "Metro Magazine"
Currently viewing results 16 - 30
Previous
PAGE OF 29
Next
Record #:
11128
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lea discusses the 2009 Triangle Design Awards presented by the North Carolina Chapter of the American Institute of Architects to the winning architectural firms. The awards offer an annual glimpse into the latest trends in building design in the Research Triangle Metropolitan Area.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
28840
Author(s):
Abstract:
The American Institute of Architects (AIA) Triangle Chapter’s Design Awards recognizes the local architecture profession’s most talented designers. The 2009 awards acknowledged varied institutional and residential projects, including an addition to a historic church, a restaurant and a new installation in the North Carolina Museum of Art’s Art Park.
Source:
Record #:
4946
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1950, the North Carolina General Assembly in a controversial move appropriated $1 million to make possible the purchase of the founding Kress Collection for the North Carolina Museum of Art. Today the museum's holdings number over 5,000 masterworks valued at over $1 billion.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
16591
Author(s):
Abstract:
The debate between WakeMed and UNC Health Care has reached a fever pitch as the expansion of facilities in certain areas and the push for physicians is being called into question legally.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
16749
Abstract:
The skipjack ADA MAE, under restoration in New Bern by a team of volunteers, is one of the few remaining historical vessels on the East Coast. She will be used as an educational vessel for school students, helping them appreciate North Carolina's coastal heritage through hands-on shipboard experience.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
17053
Author(s):
Abstract:
The East Carolina University Brody School of Medicine has come a long way in a short time. It is one of the ten \"youngest\" medical school sin the country, but in a short time it has become the focal point for many advanced therapies and treatments that are drawing doctors from around the nation and the world to Greenville, North Carolina for training.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
5055
Author(s):
Abstract:
For the first time in its 68-year history, the North Carolina Symphony will have its own performance hall. On February 21, 2001, the symphony will play a grand-opening concert in the new 1,700-seat Meymandi Concert Hall in Raleigh. Prior to this, the symphony played in Memorial Auditorium, a venue shared by a variety of performing groups.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
16534
Abstract:
Alex B. \"Andy\" Andrews IV, the namesake and descendant of railroad magnate Col. Alex B. Andrews, one of North Carolina's most significant personages of the 19th century, has commissioned the restoration of a painting of his illustrious ancestor completed in 1880 by artist William Garl Brown, Jr. Andrews is donating the restored painting to the NC Museum of History.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
7412
Author(s):
Abstract:
At one time dredging by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in the North Carolina's inlets and Intracoastal Waterway was a year-round project to keep the navigable channels open for fishing and related businesses. Now Congress and the current federal administration are intent on getting out of the dredging business. Many legislators feel it is the job of the coastal states to keep their waterways clear. Efforts by North Carolina's U.S. Senators Dole and Burr, and Congressman Walter Jones to add more dredging money to the budget have been unsuccessful. Six of the state Congressional delegation did not support Dole, Burr, and Jones in their attempt to add more dredging money. Leutze outlines an approach to educate representatives within North Carolina and without on the importance of keeping these waterways cleared.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
17043
Author(s):
Abstract:
Given the rut that North Carolina may be in, Smith calls for the State's involvement in more competitive high-tech industries, growth in the biotech and life-science sectors, and more knowledgeable workers and education in these areas.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
16676
Author(s):
Abstract:
Since childhood, Jimmy English has been bringing in some large wildlife--alligators. Although much has changed in Wilmington and New Hanover County, English's methods have changed little.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
16743
Abstract:
Residents at the Carolina House of Pinehurst, the largest provider of assisted living and Alzheimer's care in North Carolina, are finding self-expression through art.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
7816
Author(s):
Abstract:
The AIA Triangle Chapter serves over 600 members from central North Carolina counties. The AIA Triangle Design Award, a juried competition, recognizes member architects for design excellence. Judges for the 2006 competition were Boston-based architects. The nine winners, selected from eighty-four entries, were divided into four Honor Awards and five Merit Awards. Projects designs must be developed in the Research Triangle, but the project can be carried out in any area of the country.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
7513
Author(s):
Abstract:
Factories that were the backbone of the tobacco industry in Durham closed in 1987. For almost two decades, the sixteen-acre property with nine buildings and over one million square feet of space declined into dilapidated warehouses with sagging roofs and broken windows. The buildings represent some of Durham's finest architecture. The Capitol Broadcasting Company and its chief executive officer, Jim Goodmon, have begun a $200 million project, which is the largest historical renovation in the history of North Carolina. Lea discusses the history and architecture of the area and the restoration project.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
15040
Author(s):
Abstract:
METRO design editor Diane Lea discusses the Boddie family and the Rose Hill Plantation located in Nash County. The family moved to North Carolina from Virginia in 1734. The original home does not stand, but part of the one built in 1792, survived and is the back wing of the present, restored Rose Hill Plantation.
Source:
Full Text: