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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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132 results for "Journal of the North Carolina Academy of Science"
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Record #:
19718
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Abstract:
\"A new endemic species of land planarian is described from the Smoky Mountains National Park. This is the first report of a new land planarian of the subfamily Microplaninae from the United States since 1954.\"
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Record #:
19714
Author(s):
Abstract:
Between the years 1983--2011, the Institute of Marine Science in Morehead City collected rainfall locally. Among the questions the authors sought to answer were how this rainfall period collection compared with previous ones and how were shark, finfish, and shrimp catches affected by rainfall and hurricane runoff and flooding.
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Record #:
19723
Abstract:
Small mammal bait preferences and population status of were studied in Great Smoky Mountains National Park during the summer of 2010. The three main objectives were to explore the effects that weather and habitat have on small mammal bait preferences; explore the longer-term effects of drought on species numbers and diversity; and document the presence of M. nivalis in the Park.
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Record #:
19727
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The authors report on several crayfish species that are expanding their range, either coming in from other states or moving into new territory within the state. Some life history and taxonomic notes for several of the species are included.
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Record #:
28423
Abstract:
North Carolina’s river drainages continue to lose their faunal distinctiveness as nonnative fish species establish themselves and expand their distributions. In the Pee Dee River drainage of North Carolina and Virginia, thirty-four fish species, including three species of suckers, are nonindigenous.
Record #:
28427
Abstract:
Greenfield Lake in Wilmington, North Carolina has experienced recent problems with algal blooms, low dissolved oxygen levels, and fish kills. Many of these issues have likely been caused by high nutrient loading. This study examined lake sediment as a source and sink for phosphorus, the nutrient most often responsible for freshwater eutrophication.
Record #:
28426
Abstract:
A capture-recapture survey of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncates) was conducted in the sounds, estuaries and near-shore waters of North Carolina in 2000 and 2006. The abundance of dolphins in this area remained relatively stable between the studies.
Record #:
28425
Author(s):
Abstract:
Atlantic midshipman fish were collected off North Carolina between 1911 to 2012, and four were found in Pamlico Sound. Once abundant their numbers have declined after 1990 when ocean water temperatures changed from cool to warm. Today they are rarely caught or seen in North Carolina.
Record #:
28422
Author(s):
Abstract:
Molecular phylogenetic analyses revealed two new crustose lichen species (genus Loxospora) from the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain of eastern North America. One species was from Assateague Island, Maryland and the second species was from Tyrrell County, North Carolina.
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Record #:
28428
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Abstract:
Atlantic bumper fish were once common, but rarely caught today in North Carolina. Their decline seems to reflect a response to changing water temperatures, cooler pre-1990 and warmer post-1990.
Record #:
28424
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Abstract:
Spinner sharks and blacktip sharks make jumps and spinning leaps out of the water. Examination of these sharks in North Carolina suggests that this behavior may occur in response to abrupt ocean water temperatures.
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Record #:
28429
Abstract:
Pugheadedness is a trait exhibited by fish such as carp and striped bass. A spotted sea trout exhibiting pigheadedness was caught in January of 2013 in Smyrna Creek, a short tributary that enters Core Sound, Carteret County, North Carolina. Reason for the occurrence of this trait remains a mystery.
Record #:
28430
Author(s):
Abstract:
In North Carolina, dog-day cicadas appear in smaller numbers every year. Observations in a Charlotte, North Carolina suburban neighborhood revealed that the cicadas were being attacked by carpenter ants as they emerged from the ground. Thus, predation is an important regulator of dog-day cicadas.
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Record #:
16648
Author(s):
Abstract:
Richard's skate was first described off New Zealand in 1961. Among the features of this deep-water skate are a diamond-shaped body and brown to gray coloration dorsally and ventrally. Few have been collected worldwide since 1961; however, recent searches of the literature have revealed two specimens that had been collected off the North Carolina coast in 1974.
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Record #:
16649
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1985, Dipturus Teevani, a long-nosed, diamond-shaped skate, was brought up from 1,900 meters deep in Atlantic waters. The capture changed its depth range from 752 meters to 1,900 meters and its distributional range north of Cape Lookout 100 meters to east of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina.
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