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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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103 results for "Journal of Early Southern Decorative Arts"
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Record #:
21915
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This article examines a series of eight embroidery samplers from the Piedmont region of North Carolina and South Carolina. These samplers were produced by schoolgirls who received instruction at academies associated with the Bethel Presbyterian Church of York County, South Carolina. The style of this group exhibits elements of Scottish and Irish needle working.
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21914
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This article examines two bedcovers from the early-19th century in the collection of Old Salem Museums & Garden and the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts. Both bedcovers belonged to women who lived in Salem, North Carolina during the 1810s.
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27885
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Thomas and Andrew Ellicott Warner were brothers, silversmiths, and working partners in Baltimore, Maryland from 1805 to 1813. They produced high-quality sword blades for the officers of the U.S. Army and militias during the Federal period. The Warner swords are in collection at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
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27886
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The identities of southern fraktur artists have rarely been identified, but the discovery of a student copybook revealed its identity as George Peter Dodson, also known as the Stony Creek artist of Shenandoah County, Virginia. Ornamented manuscripts in the copybook also revealed links to the identification of other fraktur artists such as Ehre Vater of North Carolina.
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Record #:
21907
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This article examines the production of tin-glazed ceramics in Salem, North Carolina and other parts of the country. Tin-glazed ceramics were first introduced to the Moravian community in Salem by Carl Eisenberg near the end of the 18th century.
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Record #:
21908
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This article examines the various ceramic traditions in 19th century Salem, North Carolina as produced by Moravian potters such as Heinrich Schaffner.
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Record #:
27882
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Evidence found in research files at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina reveals the diverse material culture and impact of cabinetmaking in Columbia and Richland County, Virginia from 1800 to 1860. Columbia’s political and geographic location made it a transition zone for people, goods, and cultures traveling between the Low country to the Piedmont regions.
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Record #:
27880
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A study by the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina examined the furniture trade between America and Jamaica during the eighteenth century. The movement of cabinetmakers such as John Fisher, coupled with the exportation of Windsor chairs to Jamaica from the eastern seaboard, reveals not only the trade of goods, but also the influence of skills, style, and culture.
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Record #:
27877
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Rug is the most frequently listed bed covering in colonial probate documents from the Chesapeake region. Due to the lack of artifact-based evidence, the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina conducted a study to determine the origins, materials, colors, and patterns of bed rugs as well as the extent and duration of their use from the seventeenth to the early nineteenth century.
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Record #:
27879
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A study by the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina examined the business records of Virginia cabinetmaker Sampson Diuguid. Analysis of Diuguid’s Ledger D account book reveals the various furniture forms he made in the early nineteenth century, and provides further knowledge of the cabinetmaking trade throughout the eastern region.
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Record #:
27866
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All state governments had record keeping procedures that documented the claims of artisans who had provided goods and services. The Decorative Arts Guide to the Records of the Auditor of Public Accounts was compiled from vouchers and accounts for work performed by craftsmen working in Virginia during 1776-1840. The guide is an important resource on the lives and work of artisans working in the antebellum south.
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Record #:
27865
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Research by the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina found new records on the apprenticeship system, trade guilds and material culture in Carolinas. The records are of convicts, indentures, redemptioners, enslaved African American and American Indian labor and apprentices.
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Record #:
27874
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A study of a painting of Benjamin Hawkins and the Creek Indians explored its relationship to Thomas Jefferson’s policy for the assimilation process during the first decade of the nineteenth century. Hawkins, a former North Carolina senator, was appointed to implement and oversee the civilization plan. Signs of assimilation are apparent in the painting, but they do not reflect an absolute change in the Creek social structure.
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Record #:
27876
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John Dart’s 1754 inventory demonstrates the strength and diversity of Charles Town, South Carolina’s textile trade in the mid-eighteenth century. It was based on society’s demand for imported foreign-made goods and their search for self-definition. Dart exploited diverse commercial opportunities to reach consumers throughout North Carolina and the eastern region.
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Record #:
27857
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The house at Berry Hill plantation is a fine example of Greek Revival architecture in Virginia, and the classical tradition that dominated architecture in the South during the antebellum period. James C. Bruce, a wealthy financier and tobacco planter, deliberately designed the house in ways which displayed his wealth and power.
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