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552 results for "Greenville Times / Pitt's Past"
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Record #:
23298
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In Martin County on their historic farm, the Ollmans take in horses with nowhere else to go.
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Record #:
23032
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Telephone service came to Greenville in 1896 with 40 initial subscribers. The first central office was located in a leased one room schoolhouse on the N/W corner of Fourth and Washington Streets with Miss Julia Foley as the first operator. In 1899, the first desk phone was owned by W. B. Wilson. In 1905, the first pay phone was installed in Coward & Wooten’s Store at a cost of 25 cents a minute. In 1915, a triangular brick Telephone building was built at the intersection of Washington Street and Dickinson Ave. in 1939, the telephone reverted to the local dial system with 2,031 subscribers. In 1956, a telephone building was built on Fifth Street and a new telephone office was built on Hooker Road in 1967. In June 1975, the old triangular brick Telephone building on Dickinson Avenue, long a Greenville landmark, was razed to the ground.
Record #:
23456
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In April of 1901, the Odd Fellows association of Bethel held a large lodge meeting. In attendance were fellow members from Greenville, Parmele, and Robersonville. The meeting took place at the Bethel Methodist Church and included a speech by Professor W.H. Ragsdale on the organization and intent of the Odd Fellows as well as an enormous outdoor dinner consisting of enough barbeque, ham, and chicken to feed nearly 400 people. Following the meeting, some members from outside of Bethel took a walk into town in order to find whiskey but discovered to their horror that the town of Bethel was a dry community and no liquor was available.
Record #:
23512
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Articles published in 1974 in The Daily Reflector provide Phil Carroll's, a local developer, and the late Leo Jenkins's, former chancellor of East Carolina University, visions for Greenville's growth of Greenville in 2000. Carroll envisioned a population of 80,000 to 100,000 and the formation and of medical and educational institutions, causing \"excellent growth in this area.\" Former Chancellor Jenkins believed that East Carolina would have a larger adult enrollment than college-age enrollment and that university professors would function more like counselors than instructors. Jenkins predicted that there would be no cars on the campus and that soccer would be the most popular sport.
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Record #:
23751
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The five sons of Walter Brown Wilson and Brittannia R. Saunders had various appointments and stations, fighting in World Wars I and II. The Wilson family of Greenville once had the distinction of being the only family on record in the War Department with five sons acting as officers in the United States Army.
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Record #:
22950
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Smithville was the first community in North Carolina to advocate secession; Greenville followed Smithville on January 11, 1861, with a 100-gun salute. Pitt County's diverse population made it a very important battleground in the war. In 1860, Pitt County's population consisted of 7,840 whites, 127 free blacks, and 8,473 slaves. G. B. Singletary formed the first military company in Pitt County, followed by the Tar River Guards and the Marlboro Guards. The first incident occurred on June 5, 1862, at Tranters Creek. Later that year, Yankees invaded Greenville on October 9th coming up the river in gun boats, raiding stores and arresting all the men in the Courthouse. The largest military activity was General Potter's raid in July 1863. There were skirmishes at Haddocks Cross Roads, Red Banks Church and Black Jack Church.
Record #:
23392
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Smithville was the first community in North Carolina to advocate secession; Greenville followed Smithville on January 11, 1861, with a 100-gun salute. The citizens of Greenville, N.C. held a meeting and adopted resolutions for a Secession Convention. F.B. Satterthwaite and Bryan Grimes represented Pitt County at the Raleigh Secession Convention on May 20, 1861. About 2,000 Pitt County men joined the Confederate militia, and about the same number of black men joined the Federal militia. Pitt County’s diverse population made it a very important battleground in the war. In 1860, Pitt County’s population consisted of 7,840 whites, 127 free blacks, and 8,473 slaves. The first incident of the Civil War involving Pitt County occurred on June 5, 1862 at Tranter’s Mill, on Tranters Creek. Union troops fired shells at the rebel cavalry near Pactolus on June 9, 1862. In July 1862, Capt. Ayres’ artillery company fired on “Yankee Hall.” Federal soldiers from Washington invaded Greenville on October 9, 1862. Union Troops from New Bern under the command of Gen. Edward E. Potter marched through Greenville in July 1863, raiding and looting local businesses. They continued on to Tarboro, and upon coming back through Pitt County, they were assaulted by rebel soldiers near Falkland. Confederate soldiers chased them all the way back to New Bern. Federal troops under Capt. Graham captured Maj. John N. Whitford’s Battalion on November 5, 1863 near Haddock’s Crossroads. On December 30, 1863, rebel troops under Major Moore attacked Federal troops six miles below Greenville. Greenville women operated two hospitals for the wounded: one in the academy that is now the site of Sheppard Memorial Library and one in the Greene-Moye-Skinner house.
Record #:
23462
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Kinchen Jahu Carpenter, a native of Rutherford County, N.C., served in Company I of the 50th North Carolina Regiment during the Civil War. During his service, from May 1862 to May 1865, Carpenter kept a diary of his experiences. The diary mentions numerous events, such as Carpenter's first days in training at Camp Mangum, the 50th's fighting in the Seven Day's battles near Richmond, as well as several expeditions in Eastern North Carolina. Carpenter mentions Greenville many times, as his regiment conducted numerous operations in the surrounding region in 1863, from Kinston to New Bern to Washington, always trying to outmaneuver the Union troops garrisoned in around New Bern and the along the coast. Carpenter and his regiment were sent west to Georgia in 1864, but returned to North Carolina to fight at the Battle of Bentonville in March 1865. The men of the 50th North Carolina, including Carpenter, received paroles on May 1, 1865 following the surrender of Lee's and Johnston's armies.
Record #:
23484
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Mrs. T. E. Hooker and friends organized the \"First Friday Afternoon Musical Club\" for interested women in the town of Greenville, limiting it to 20 members. An elaborate German (dance) took place in Perkins Hall on a Friday night in December 1908. Lanterns and American flags from Ellsworth of New York decorated the hall. Walter Wilson, Jr. and Miss Nell Skinner, along with others led the German dance. Mr. W. H. Strum and Miss Ada Norris applied for a marriage license at the Register of Deeds office in Pitt County during October 1893. Ms. Norris's parents objected to the marriage, vowing to stop the wedding. Mr. Strum waited for his chance, and he and Ms. Norris were married within 30 feet of the bride's father, without him even knowing of the union.
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Record #:
23004
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Originally known as “Arthur,” it developed after 1907, when the Norfolk and Southern Railroad built a line through the area. It began when two Greenville businessmen, L. C. Arthur and C. T. Munford, bought what was known as the “Becton Farm,” and began subdividing the land and selling lots. The town was incorporated as “Arthur” in 1911. The town gained notoriety in 1916 as the home of “Gar Gar” Edwards, the cigar smoking three year old. On April 16, 1932, the entire business district burned down. In 1933, the town of Arthur was incorporated as “Bell-Arthur.” In 1966, the town lost its charter.
Record #:
22901
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Located near Belvoir along the Tar River, Bensboro was once the ancestral home of the Atkinson family of Pitt County. In the late 1700s and early 1800s, Benjamin Atkinson made it a thriving commercial center with his store and consistent transporting business. When he died on February 2, 1816 at 63 years of age, his businesses were divided and sold. However, the 1,500 acres of plantation were not sold. Ben Ashley Atkinson inherited the land and tried to use the plantation as the cocoonery for a Greenville Silk Company. Peyton Ashley Atkinson took over Bensboro on October 1, 1839 after his father Ben Ashley died. Peyton married the very prominent Susan Virginia Streeter of Greene County on July 27, 1843. This marriage caused Peyton Atkinson to run two plantations in two different counties: Bensboro in Pitt County and Streeter in Greene County. By this time, Bensboro was apparently a beautiful place with its lush trees and rich furnishings. After Peyton died on February 2, 1863, Benjamin Streeter Atkinson took over the plantations. He was elected to serve in the state legislature. However, debts and economic recessions caused Bensboro to become disarrayed. Bensboro burned in 1895 and Susan Streeter Atkinson died on December 4, 1895. Thus, Bensboro finally was lost forever.
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Record #:
22908
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The crossroads once described as "16 miles from everywhere" is Bethel. Later known as Brandon, this village which grew around a church which was formed by 1774. On April 28, 1858, the town finally received a post office with Bethel as the official name for the town. The town was incorporated on December 18, 1873. In 1883, the population of Bethel stood at 200. Professor Z. D. McWhorter opened his Bethel Academy to educate the local male population. Although this little town had a small population, the businesses and social life in the town thrived during the late nineteenth century.
Record #:
23385
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Greenville has been home to a long list of bottling companies. The first known bottling company was in 1883, when S. M. Schwartz opened the Greenville Bottling Company. In 1884, J. H. Shelburn & Anderson opened a beer bottling establishment. In 1892, Ed. H. Shelburn & Co. opened a bottling company for carbonated drinks and beer. He was the first person to sell Coca Cola in Greenville in 1893 and by 1897 was one of the largest bottlers in the State. Other bottling companies include: Euvita Bottling Co. in 1903; Burton Soda Water and Ice Cream Works in 1906; the Pepsi-Cola Bottling Company in 1908; Coca Cola Bottling Works in 1908; the Chero-Cola Bottling Company in 1915; the Mint Cola Bottling Works in 1919; the Cherry Blossom Bottling Company in 1922; the Lime Cola Bottling Company in 1922; the Orange Crush Bottling Company in 1923; the Nehi Bottling Company in 1933; the Double Cola Bottling Company in 1939; and the Greenville Tip Company in 1940.
Record #:
22854
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The Greenville Bottling Company, a beer company established by S. M. Schwartz in 1883, was Greenville's first known first bottling company. J. H. Shelburn established another beer bottling company in 1884. In 1892, Ed. H. Shelburn & Co. began a bottling company for carbonated drinks, the first to sell Coca-Cola in 1893. J. W. Bryan invented the drink, Euvita, and in 1903, established the Euvita Bottling Co. In 1908, T. M. Hooker and W. A. Teel, Jr. began the Pepsi-Cola Bottling Company. The Burton Soda Water and Ice Cream Works opened in 1906 bottling Seven Springs Mineral Water. W. J. Hardee, C. M. Warren, and R. T. Cox began the Greenville Chero-Cola Bottling Company in 1915. In 1916, James M. Hines opened the Coca-Cola Bottling Works. The Orange Crush Bottling Company opened in 1923. J. Carroll Waldrop started the Nehi Bottling Company in 1933. The Double Cola Bottling Company started in 1939. The Gary Beverage Company of Charlotte, NC established the Greenville Tip Company in 1940.
Record #:
22994
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Abstract:
Cottendale, located near Falkland, was the renowned home of two extraordinary people: Robert Randolph Cotten and his wife, Sallie Southall Cotten. Both were involved in local, State and national cultural, governmental, military, agricultural, and business activities. In 1931, Pitt County named the eight mile stretch of road from Bruce to Greenville the “Sallie Southall Cotton Memorial Drive,” and numerous clubs paid to have dogwoods, sycamore, crepe myrtle and cedars planted along the road in her honor. The trees were cut down in 1951 to widen the road. On March 25, 1961, Cottendale, with its antique furniture, silver and family portraits, burned to the ground.
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