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9 results for Women--Societies and clubs
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Record #:
8819
Abstract:
Juanita Martin Bryant recently became president of the General Federation of Women's Clubs. The Yadkin County native began her volunteer service in 1953 and now heads an organization with over ten million members in forty six countries. Bryant lives in the GFWC's presidential home in Washington, D.C., but she rarely gets to spend time there. Instead, she is constantly traveling the world attending to federation business that ranges from sweatshop reform, supporting the Marshall Plan, promoting adult education, and encouraging the restoration of Independence Hall. Bryant has traveled to such places as Cambodia, Guam, Taiwan, Bangladesh, and Saudi Arabia, and averages a sixteen-hour workday. She has also served the state as regional director for the North Carolina School of the Arts, been a member of the North Carolina Historical Commission, and served on the Governor's Commission on Education.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 7, Dec 1983, p19-20, por
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Record #:
27502
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Abstract:
The Orange County’s Women’s Center is praised for its work serving the women of Orange County, but that hasn’t protected it from conflict. The Center is currently divided over The Women’s Book Exchange and 5 board members have resigned as a result. The board voted to rescind the merger agreement between the Center and the Book Exchange after a dispute over the control of the lending library caused by lesbian oriented books. Intended to serve all women, some question whether the Center does so after what they feel is sexual discrimination.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 8 Issue 45, November 7-13 1990, p7-8 Periodical Website
Record #:
27721
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Abstract:
The Women Working in the Meat Business is a conference hosted by NC Choices, a program of the Center for Environmental Farming Systems. The recently held conference brings together women who work at every stage of meat supply chains to help close the gaps that make moving pasture-raised, local meat from farm to table so difficult. The conference aims to show women that the roles they play are essential and they can help retool the meat supply chain in the United States.
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Record #:
27719
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Abstract:
Girls Rock NC is a winner of a 2014 Indie Art Award. The group runs a camp, after school programs, and retreats for adults. Their main initiative is a music camp for girls 7-16 to help them learn to raise their voices as young women through music. The Chapel Hill group hosts sessions on body confidence, the history of women in music, and leadership. Girls Rock NC helps girls gain confidence and works for social justice.
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Record #:
29021
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The Bellwood Extension & Community Association is a 102-year old community organization in northern Cleveland County. Formerly known as the Warlick Tomato Club, the group was founded in 1915 by home demonstration agents to teach farm girls and young women how to grow and can food in their homes. The history of the club and movement across the state are detailed and the history of the Bellwood club is told by Mary Jane Seagle and Jean Ann Privett.
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Record #:
29914
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The Southeast Wise Women Herbal Conference began thirteen years ago as a gathering of women who met to immerse themselves in the study of herbal medicine and the Wise Woman tradition of Earth-based healing. The annual event takes place in Black Mountain, North Carolina, and features classes in herbal medicines, holistic healing, women health and wellness.
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Record #:
31667
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The women of North Carolina’s electric membership corporations are meeting the challenges for service in rural areas of their state. Since organizing into local cooperative women’s committees in the late 1960s, the ladies have volunteered to keep interested women aware of the importance of and the problems facing the rural electric program. This article highlights their leadership, accomplishments, and some of the projects they have been involved in.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 6 Issue 5, May 1974, p12-13, por
Record #:
32237
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Abstract:
As a young girl, Katherine Sweet Babington hid herself in the local Masonic lodge room tended to by her Grandfather and six Uncles. Over time she learned the secrets of the order; and when caught, was eventually administered the obligations of Master Mason.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 12, Nov 1958, p
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Record #:
34736
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Madie Bell was a Harlowe, North Carolina native and attended Greensboro Female College where she studied teaching. Bell worked as an educator in Morehead City at the turn of the 20th century. An active member of the Daughters of the American Revolution and the Daughters of the Confederacy, Bell organized the Morehead City Woman’s Club, serving as its first president in 1921. She continued a life of civic service, sitting on the Board of Trustees for Morehead City schools.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 23 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2007-2008, p14-15, il, por