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13 results for Technology--Study and teaching
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Record #:
211
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The Lincoln County School of Technology offers instruction in service-oriented jobs to better prepare non-collegiate people to advance in the job market.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 50 Issue 5, May 1992, p22-23, il
Record #:
20322
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Students in rural North Carolina high schools were previously at a disadvantage in receiving opportunities to study for high-paying technological or scientific professional careers. Recently, STEM is a growing trend in high school education, and Early College programs in North Carolina schools allow students to take college-level science, technology, engineering, and mathematics courses early in their high school career to prepare them for STEM careers.
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Record #:
23158
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In this Business and Education Round Table, business professionals discuss the need to focus on STEM education in North Carolina schools.
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Record #:
27860
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The first ever CHAT Festival was held on UNC-Chapel Hill’s campus. The title stands for Collaborations: Humanities, Arts, and Technology. The gather features four full days of performances, hands-on workshops, interactive software exhibits, and panel discussions with nationally recognized designers, entrepreneurs, artists, and scholars. This group uses, develops, and markets the technology on display at the festival.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 7, February 2010, p29 Periodical Website
Record #:
28220
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The Teaming for Technology program at the Raleigh Boys Club has paired with players in the Carolina Football Development League to teach them how to refurbish computers. As part of the Teen Tech program, the players will then teach middle-school boys how to refurbish computers. The program encourages mentoring and the computers are then donated to schools, nonprofit or community organizations, or low-income children. This program helps teens acquire marketable skills and helps to eliminate the digital divide in the state.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 8, February 2007, p18 Periodical Website
Record #:
28219
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The Goodwill Community Foundation in Raleigh is helping to get rid of the digital divide in the Triangle Area. The foundation works to teach basic computer skills to individuals of all ages and backgrounds. The educational program is free and more than 3,000 people completed courses in the program in 2006.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 8, February 2007, p17 Periodical Website
Record #:
28223
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Chapel Hill’s Judy Hallman is the executive director of RTPNet. RTPNet helps provide information technology service to over 100 nonprofit and community organizations in North Carolina. Before helping start RTPNet, Hallman worked for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and helped introduce computers and the Internet to the university. Hallman is retiring from her job soon, but will continue to do similar work developing open-source content management software for nonprofits.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 8, February 2007, p23 Periodical Website
Record #:
28222
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The e-NC Authority and Jane Smith Patterson are working to bring broadband to North Carolina’s most distressed counties. This service also brings training and education essential to finding and creating new jobs. Without access to technology and broadband internet service, economic development in rural counties of the state will suffer.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 8, February 2007, p20-21 Periodical Website
Record #:
23715
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It was back between 1969 and 1973 when there was an Aerospace Program at ECU, the Physics Department purchased an “Atom Smasher,” and Richard S. Lennon, Jr., who worked with NASA computer operations in support of the first-man-on-the-moon mission, was appointed acting director of the ECU computing Center, that there was a Planetarium proposed for ECU. In 1969, the architectural firm of Dudley and Shoe were hired to come up with plans to show the public. The proposed site for the Planetarium would be on Ninth Street between Charles Street and Lawrence Street (behind what is now Mendenhall). On March 7, 1970, plans for the Planetarium were formally announced by the University with a proclamation from the Governor. Challenge grants were given by the American Credit Corporation Foundation, Wilbur Hardee, president of Little Mint, Inc., and others, but there was funding problems. The NC Legislature didn’t give the planning funds and the idea died. With the shift in eastern North Carolina to an economy based more on science and technology in the 1960s and 1970s, the concept of a Planetarium began at East Carolina University. Despite donations and a hearty campaign, Greenville was limited by the 1974 NC Legislature and the Planetarium was never built.
Record #:
31165
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Greene County is in the first year of a four-year lease agreement with Apple Corporation that will provide laptop computers for every middle and high school student in the county system. The program called iTech is the first countywide one-on-one project of its kind in North Carolina, teaching students skills they can apply in the digital age. The vision of Green County leaders is to go wireless throughout the county, generate job growth, and draw high-tech business to the county.
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Record #:
34908
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Mike Schlegel is a program manager at Triangle J Council of Governments in Raleigh. While his primary work involves water resource management, Schlegel is also the founder of Whiteboard Academy. This online academy provides coaching and online seminars on visual thinking and note taking. Schlegel was first introduced to visual thinking and graphics in 2013. He found the courses, which focus on putting words into a graphic form to help others understand, helped public perception of his work. So far, the Whiteboard Academy has worked with several North Carolina institutions to help them better represent data to the public.
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CityView (NoCar F 264.T3 W4), Vol. Issue , January/February 2017, p29-34, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
36575
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A passion for helping others gain technical skills and engage in sustainability efforts encouraged this non-profit organization, in partnership with its CyberPals program, to sell computers to individuals with disabilities. Others services offered are volunteers teaching computer classes and scholarship assistance with paying for the computer.
Record #:
36504
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Digitalization made all the difference when trying to preserve historical movements. It enables researchers to load their data onto searchable database and access it anywhere. The article outlines the principles and methods used in a multi-dimensional project centered in western North Carolina.