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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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20 results for Taxation
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Record #:
36254
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Until 2017, one of the areas that had received comparatively little political attention in North Carolina’s state lawmakers is transportation. Under a Republican-controlled state government, ceasing the transfer of funds from the Highway Fund and Highway Trust Fund. This, along with a change in taxes and fees, promised to provide more funds for transportation-related projects. An accompanying chart illustrated the proposed transportation spending over the next four years.
Record #:
36273
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Economic and occupational growth in the Tarheel State, partly because of sectors such as banking and higher education, has fed what Hood called North Carolina Exceptionalism. What may be less obvious to those on both side of the political spectrum is the role that the Republican and Democrat parties have played in the growth of such sectors, whether for credit or blame.
Record #:
36298
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Contentions between America’s political parties arise from misunderstandings as much as differences of opinion, according to the author. Clearing up some misunderstandings is Hood’s analysis of how the first amendment, tax cuts, war on poverty, and fight to improve education impact American society.
Record #:
30968
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Holly Springs, NC experienced a boom in residential growth throughout the 90's due to the sprawl of the Triangle area. By the end of the 90's, the town with only a single grocery store established an economic development department with plans to balance its tax base by recruiting industry.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 40 Issue , 2015, p47-50, il
Record #:
6653
Abstract:
Taxes are necessary for government to function. POPULAR GOVERNMENT posed six questions on taxation to two policy analysts - Roy Cordato from the John Locke Foundation, and Elaine Mejia, director of the North Carolina Budget and Tax Center in Raleigh. The questions included \"Should tax policy address specific economic development objectives in North Carolina?\" and \"Is North Carolina a 'high-tax state'?\"
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 69 Issue 2, Winter 2004, p4-15, il, f
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Record #:
5798
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Funding waste disposal programs for certain large items, such as tires and appliances, is a challenge for local governments. To deal with this problem, North Carolina introduced an innovative program, the \"advance disposal tax,\" or taxes consumers pay on certain items when they are purchased. North Carolina was one of the first states to institute this tax. Hughes discusses why the state chose this approach and the features of the program.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 68 Issue 2, Winter 2003, p17-23, il, f
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Record #:
3538
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The Tax Payers Relief Act of 1997 includes changes in capital gains taxes, agricultural programs, credits for education, child credits, and Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs).
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Record #:
4066
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Taxation was a fact of life for the colonists as early as the 1600s. The main tax was the poll, or capitation, tax. However, as specific needs arose, taxes were levied for them. For example, in 1714-15, a tax paid for the Tuscarora War, and forts were built at Cape fear and Ocracoke with a eight-year tax levied in 1748.
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Record #:
27388
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Durham-based Financial Democracy Campaign is voicing its opposition to the bailout being offered by the federal government to the savings and loan industry. The group is advocating on behalf of middle and lower income Americans who will likely pay for the majority of the bailout through taxes. The group opposes corporate welfare.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 9 Issue 17, April 24-30 1991, p8-9 Periodical Website
Record #:
27386
Author(s):
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As April 15th approaches, the tax laws of the federal and state government are explained. The history of taxation and legislation is also examined. Rates of taxation on goods and services and personal income tax are explored comparing individuals in the top one percent with those in the working class. The influence business lobbyists have on tax laws is also explored.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 9 Issue 15, April 10-16 1991, p8-9 Periodical Website
Record #:
277
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Governor Martin has proposed to provide more than a billion dollars worth of tax relief during the next four years.
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Record #:
31354
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The 1985 General Assembly enacted a sweeping change in the North Carolina inheritance laws. Effective last August 1, North Carolina has an unlimited marital deduction, meaning a spouse may pass to the other an unlimited amount of property free of inheritance or gift tax.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 17 Issue 12, Dec 1985, p16
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Record #:
18647
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Based on a recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling allowing severance taxes to be imposed on mining in Montana, the state was reviewing the possibilities of enacting similar legislation for mining within its boundaries. Specifically, state legislators were considering a tax on the state's phosphate production. The article reviews how much money would be generated from such a tax and how the revenue would be distributed.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 48 Issue 3, Winter 1983, p47-51, il
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Record #:
31224
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There have been four major trends in state taxation over the years, and can be seen in North Carolina's tax system as well. First, the distribution of tax impact has show a ratio of total support in favor of steady relief of property tax. This was followed by the progressive versus proportional taxation, where the state has had only two opportunities to introduce progressive tax structures--personal income tax, and estate and inheritance tax. The third trend was the development of local non-property taxes due to pressure on property tax following World War II, excessive pressure on state broad-based taxes, and the failure of state aid to bring financial support to municipalities. The final trend has been the impact of tax sacrifice.
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Record #:
30180
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Given North Carolina's average contribution of 1.53 percent, the proposed federal budget for 1953 would cost the state over $1 billion. This amount is over five times the amount North Carolina as a state spends on all governmental services, including roads, schools, and other state departments and agencies.
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