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6 results for Sea turtles--Research
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Record #:
8796
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Abstract:
Sea turtles emerged around 110 million years ago. At their peak there were four families of them, each with several dozen species. Today, only two families survive. Amanda Southwood, a sea turtle researcher at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington, received a North Carolina Fishery Resource Grant in 2006 to study sea turtle movements. The turtles studied are those that have become entangled in fishing nets in the lower Cape Fear River then released. Without satellite and high-frequency tags to track the turtles, there is no way to know if the released animal survived or not.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2007, p20-23, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
25124
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Abstract:
Graduate student Kimberly Hernandez explains how her research on shoreline preservation may help keep the sea turtle populations up and make them more balanced in the sex produced by the sand.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 5, Holiday 2014, p32-33, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
26172
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Abstract:
UNC scientists are studying loggerhead sea turtles to learn how adults find their way back to their birthplace. They believe turtles have the ability to orient themselves through the magnetic field of the earth.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 13 Issue 2, Jan 1997, p4-5, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26203
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Abstract:
Professor Charles Peterson and undergraduate research assistant Tracey Langhorne conducted a research project on the nesting habits of the loggerhead sea turtle. They concluded that the number of campers at Hammocks Beach did not interfere with sea turtle nesting success.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Fall 1990, p18-19, por Periodical Website
Record #:
30133
Abstract:
Information is presented on the occurrence of five species of marine turtles in North Carolina waters. The leatherback and loggerhead sea turtles, the two most commonly occurring species, are emphasized. Unpublished records indicate that the leatherback typically occurs in North Carolina throughout the warmer months in relatively shallow shelf waters, and may not be an open-ocean wanderer.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 5, July 1981, p96-105, il, map, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
30939
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Abstract:
What happens when a sea turtle gets hooked by a recreational angler? Diana Hackenburg explores efforts to measure and improve sea turtle health following an accidental capture.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 3, Summer 2016, p20-25, il, por Periodical Website
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