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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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6 results for School buses
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Record #:
305
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North Carolina now requires bus drivers to be at least eighteen years old. The General Assembly has to find $18.8 million to pay for more adult drivers.
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North Carolina Insight (NoCar JK 4101 N3x), Vol. 10 Issue 4, June 1988, p17-30, il, bibl, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
13705
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Before buses carried children to school, a horse drawn wagon sufficed. Included in the article is a photograph of the 1910 \"school bus.\"
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 28, Dec 1952, p6, il
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Record #:
17691
Abstract:
School buses have come a long way from horse-drawn wagons to today. Today, the North Carolina highway patrol trains 9,000 school bus drivers a year and checks 7,000 school bus routes a month.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 20 Issue 8, May 1954, p12-13
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Record #:
29439
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Abstract:
Digital Recorders, Inc., a Research Triangle Park business, has developed a solid-state recorded announcement system to communicate with students while they are boarding or leaving the bus. The company hopes its technology will reduce school bus related injury and death.
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Record #:
31071
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Abstract:
North Carolina is one of eleven states that will be getting a higher grade for investing in energy-efficiency this school year. Through its Plug-In Hybrid Electric School Bus Project, Advanced Energy, a Raleigh-based nonprofit corporation, arranged with IC Corporation, the nation’s largest school bus manufacturer, to provide hybrid school buses to the Wake County and Mecklenburg County school districts.
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Record #:
37609
Author(s):
Abstract:
What defines school days for the current classes of public school students could perhaps not have been envisioned by North Carolina’s first public school teacher, George W. Garrett. Likewise, today’s students likely could not perceive a day minus buses, or the student body not split up into grade levels, as it was for students at Tabor City’s Guide School, pictured.
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