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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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19 results for Radio broadcasting
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Record #:
3001
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The Telecommunications Act of 1996 allows one company to own an unlimited number of radio stations nationwide. SFX Broadcasting of New York, the nation's second largest radio conglomerate, owns four Raleigh stations.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 14 Issue 25, June 1996, p9,11,12, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3129
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A new trend in radio broadcasting is for one company to own an unlimited number of stations nationwide. Consolidation of this type has occurred in Charlotte, the Triad, and the Triangle. Some fear this will decrease competition and local interest.
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Record #:
3518
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George Denny of Washington, one of the pioneers of radio broadcasting in the 1930s and 1940s, created one of the country's first successful talk shows, \"America's Town Meeting of the Air.\"
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Record #:
4986
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North Carolina has a legacy of great radio broadcasters who brought listeners local and world news, played their favorite music, and were, in many ways, favorite visitors through the day. Westbrook covers a very few of the many, including Max Meek (High Point), Charlie Gaddy (Raleigh), and Carl Lamm (Smithfield).
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 68 Issue 11, Apr 2001, p56-58, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
10915
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Broadcasting is almost 50 years old in North Carolina. The state's commercial broadcasters include approximately 190 AM radio stations, 70 FM radio stations, and 19 television stations. The article includes information on the current status of broadcasting in the state.
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Record #:
11473
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Charles H. Crutchfield is president of the Jefferson-Pilot Broadcasting Company, a company he has headed since 1945. It is not the largest radio-TV operation in the nation, but few of the industry's major executives are better known in business and government, even the White House, than he is. Crutchfield is featured in We the People of North Carolina magazine's Businessman in the News.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 33 Issue 10, Oct 1975, p13-14, 16, 44, 46, il, por
Record #:
11832
Abstract:
This article contains information on radio and TV broadcasting in the state and the revenues and profits in each market served by the stations.
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Record #:
14231
Abstract:
Much like Orson Welles' War of the Worlds, a North Carolina radio personality decided to stage a false report of alien activity. Spurred by frequent appearance of flying saucer stories in newspapers across the state, the author wrote a story intended solely to mock those he read in the newspaper. His false flying saucer story aired at 10 p.m. on WPTF and resulted in panicked phone calls to the station. A transcript of the radio broadcast is printed in its entirety.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 10, Aug 1948, p3-4, 17
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Record #:
14783
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Lee Vickers of Durham worked as a radio announcers for Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS). A graduate of Duke University, his radio career began in the Raleigh-Durham area. He moved to Washington D.C. in 1938 and landed a position at WTOP, a then powerful Washington D.C. station. It was in his role as night manager at this station that allowed Vickers to announce breaking news and introduce the president before national addresses.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 3, June 1943, p3, 24, por
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Record #:
14940
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At one time AM radio reigned supreme in the broadcasting world. While 223 of the state's 320 licensed commercial stations are AM, FM radio is making inroads, with an estimated three out of four listeners now tuning to FM stations. AM broadcasters are scrambling to find ways to lure them back and bolster their sagging share of advertising revenues.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 6 Issue 7, July 1986, p12-14, 16, 18-20, 22, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
19323
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Abstract:
Grant recounts the life of L. A. \"Speed\" Riggs, the well-known tobacco auctioneer from Goldsboro. He was probably the fastest speaking person in the country, and it was his machine-gun tongue that helped him on his rise to fame. He was selling tobacco when he was spotted by officials of the American Tobacco Company who decided he was the person for the Lucky Strike trademark. For the past seven years he has been in New York during his auctioneering of Lucky Strike cigarettes on a number of coast-to-coast radio programs.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 37, Feb 1944, p1, 29, por
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Record #:
24023
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Mountain Area Radio Reading Service provides readouts of the news to Asheville locals over the radio. This Service is particularly geared towards helping those with vision and print disabilities.
Record #:
24406
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Abstract:
This article discusses radio stations in North Carolina’s biggest cities and how they compete with each other for advertisers and listeners. It also discusses broadcast groups and how they buy and transform radio stations, as well as discussing the overall trends in the radio market.
Record #:
24772
Abstract:
During World War II, Beaufort County began broadcasting US news and information to countries in South America, Central America, and Africa through the Voice of America radio station. Voice of America was an important way to communicate to these other countries during the war and especially during the 1950s, gaining it national renown. The station continued to operate with sites in both Beaufort and Pitt Counties until 2006 when the signal permanently went down.
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Record #:
25446
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The student-run campus radio station, WWWS, was extremely popular among students. So popular, in fact, that when the station switched to only FM broadcasting, there was a rush to switch by students on campus as well.