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17 results for Nature Conservancy. North Carolina Chapter
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Record #:
549
Author(s):
Abstract:
The mission of the North Carolina Chapter of the Nature Conservancy is to protect plants, animals, and natural communities.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 60 Issue 2, July 1992, p15-17, il
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Record #:
581
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Astute application of the tax laws and strong ties to the corporate establishment are allowing The Nature Conservancy's NC Chapter to acquire land, thus protecting endangered plants and animals.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 4, Apr 1991, p52-60, il
Record #:
2985
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Nature Conservancy manages 55,799 acres of land and protects 370,000 more. Each year it conducts over sixty field trips into natural areas, including the Green Swamp and Black River, to give people a closer look at nature.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 64 Issue 3, Aug 1996, p21-23, il
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Record #:
8986
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bluff Mountain was purchased by the North Carolina Nature Conservatory last year. Over thirty rare and endangered plants grow on the mountain. Many rare birds have been spotted on or around the mountain. The conservatory has erected a gate to discourage hikers and bicyclists from roaming the mountain and trampling the vegetation.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 4, Sept 1980, p22-25, 32, il
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Record #:
15824
Abstract:
The North Carolina Nature Conservancy first opened its doors in Chapel Hill in 1977. Today it has grown to over 2,000 members statewide. The Conservancy is a publicly-supported, non-profit, scientific and education organization. Since its inception, the Conservancy has successfully preserved eight of the ten most ecologically significant areas in North Carolina.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Fall 1980, p7-9, f
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Record #:
16330
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Abstract:
Rabb discusses the work of the North Carolina Chapter of the Nature Conservancy. The Conservancy buys property to protect endangered species or important habitats. Since the local chapter formed in 1977, it has bought 320,000 acres and placed it off-limits to real estate development. Almost 70 percent of the preserved land has come in as gifts, and the chapter has the support of forty-two North Carolina corporate contributors who help supply the group's land protection fund.
Record #:
16608
Author(s):
Abstract:
Leutze discusses how North Carolina state budget cuts affect programs such as The Nature Conservancy (TNC).
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Record #:
26615
Author(s):
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Henry David Thoreau’s Walden Pond is a symbol of peace and beauty in nature. The North Carolina Nature Conservancy refers to Walden Ponds in our state as the natural areas they aim to conserve. Currently, the group is concentrating on water quality problems in the Roanoke River and watershed.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 35 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1988, p11-13, il
Record #:
26940
Author(s):
Abstract:
A woodlands tract, known as Camassia Slopes, harbors rare and endangered species of wildflowers along the Roanoke River in Northampton County. The North Carolina Nature Conservancy will manage the site as a wildlife sanctuary and field laboratory for education and research projects. They will also begin an inventory of the plant species and monitor wildflower populations.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 8, Aug 1982, p16, por
Record #:
808
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Nature Conservancy has an impressive record in preserving endangered habitats.
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Record #:
2170
Author(s):
Abstract:
In November, 1994, the Nature Conservancy and the Georgia- Pacific Corporation agreed to co-manage 21,000 acres of hardwood bottomlands along the Roanoke River between Williamston and Plymouth, in an effort to protect the area.
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Record #:
5368
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Abstract:
The Nature Conservancy is marking twenty-five years of preserving a variety of natural areas across the state. Nationally, the group has a million members, with 26,000 in North Carolina. The state group has also protected 538,459 acres. Lynch discusses the group's accomplishments over the past twenty-five years and its plans for the future.
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Record #:
29203
Author(s):
Abstract:
Panthertown Valley, nestled between the resort towns in Jackson and Macon counties, North Carolina is a scenic and ecological wonderland with cliffs and valleys, harbors and headways, endangered species and trout streams. The natural marvels of Panthertown Valley are under the watchful eye of North Carolina's chapter of the Nature Conservancy, and with the cooperation of the Duke Energy Company has been added to the Nantahala National Forest.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 4, April 1991, p52-54, 56, 60, por
Record #:
29204
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the help of the NC Nature Conservancy, US Fish and Wildlife, and money donated by the Prudential Insurance Co., Alligator River, 141,600 acres, is the third largest wildlife refuge east of the Mississippi River.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 4, Apr 1991, p58
Record #:
32910
Author(s):
Abstract:
Support for the Nature Conservancy has grown in five years to include nineteen companies in North Carolina. Corporate involvement is inspired by belief in the merit of the conservancy’s program and in many cases by the tax benefits. Since 1977, the North Carolina Chapter of the Nature Conservancy has preserved 50,000 acres.
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